• <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> FIRE OF LONDON. A True Pourtraict with a Brief Description Of that Deplorable Fire of London. Sold for US$ 6,875 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> MATHER, INCREASE. A Brief History of the Warr With the Indians in New-England. Sold for US$ 45,000 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> SALEM WITCH TRIALS. Manuscript Document variously signed. Sold for US$ 6,875 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> REVERE, PAUL. The Bloody Massacre perpetrated in King-Street Boston. Sold for US$ 100,000 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> LEXINGTON AND CONCORD. Bloody Butchery by the British Troops. Sold for US$ 118,750 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. The New-England Chronicle. Sold for US$ 257,000 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION. By the President of the United States. Sold for US$ 15,000 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> BASEBALL. Boston Union Athletic Exhibition Company Grounds. Sold for US$ 15,000 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> MCCLELLAND, GEORGE WILLIAM. Eniac-Birth Certificate of Computer Age. 1880-1955. Typed Letter Signed. Sold for US$ 13,750 inc. premium.
  • <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>F. Scott Fitzgerald. The Great Gatsby. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1925.First edition, first issue in a near fine jacket.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Ernest Hemingway. The Sun Also Rises. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1926. First edition, first issue.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Jack Kerouac. On the Road. New York: Viking, 1957. First edition, presentation copy.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>JRR Tolkien. The Hobbit. London: George Allen & Unwin, Ltd., 1937. First edition, fine copy in jacket.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Vladimir Nabokov. Lolita. Paris: the Olympia Press, 1955. First edition presentation copy inscribed on the half-title.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Tennessee Williams. A Streetcar Named Desire. Norfolk, CT: New Directions, 1947. Inscribed by Tennesee Williams and Director Elia Kazan with additional inscriptions or signatures by all the cast members.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>T.S. Eliot. The Waste Land. Richmond, Surrey: Printed and published by Leonard and Virignia Woolf, 1923. First English edition, nscribed to Eliot’s patroness Lady Mary Lilian Rothermere.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Ernest Hemingway. Three Stories and Ten Poems. Paris: Contact Publishing Co., 1923. A mint first edition presentation copy of Hemingway’s landmark first book.
    <b>Sotheby's New York, 1 April 2014: </b> A Modern Library: The Gordon Waldorf Collection.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>William Faulkner. Light in August. New York: Harrison Smith & Robert Haas, 1932. First edition inscribed to Myrtle Ramey.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>James Joyce. Ulysses. Paris: Shakespeare & Co, 1922. First edition, one of 150 press-numbered copies on vergé d’Arches.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>F. Scott Fitzgerald. This Side of Paradise. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1920. First edition with jacket in fine condition.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Dashiell Hammett. The Thin Man. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, MCMXXXIV. First American edition. A presentation copy inscribed.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Raymond Chandler. Farewell, My Lovely. New York: Knopf, 1940. First edition presentation copy, being a copy that Chandler originally retained, inscribed on the front endpaper.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>J.D. Salinger. The Catcher in the Rye. Boston: Little, Brown, & Co., 1951. First edition.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Anthony Burgess. A Clockwork Orange. London: Heinemann, 1962. First edition and a rare presentation copy inscribed by the author.
  • <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> DALI, BRETON, V. HUGO and GALA. <i>Surrealist portrait of Lenin</i>. 1932. Cadavre exquis signed by all four. On a postcard addressed to René Char. Estimate €15,000-20,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> CELINE. <i>Voyage au bout de la nuit</i>. One of 20 copies on vélin d’Arches, inscribed to Roland Saucier and a binding by A. Cerutti. Estimate €80,000-120,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> PROUST. <i>Autograph letter to Gaston Gallimard</i>, about the Jeunes filles en fleurs and his dreyffusian past. December 21, 1919. 4 pages. Estimate €10,000-15,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> REVERDY. <i>La Lucarne ovale. 1916</i>. First edition. One of 6 copies on Japan paper. Binding by Jean de Gonet. With a letter by Pierre Albert-Birot. Estimate €28,000-35,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> STENDHAL. <i>Histoire de la Peinture en Italie</i>. 1817. First edition, inscribed to count Kosakowsky.<br>Estimate €20,000-30,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> BAUDELAIRE. Théophile Gautier. 1859. Exceptional copy with contemporary binding, inscribed to Edouard Manet.<br>Estimate €40,000-60,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> OVIDIUS. [<i>Complete works</i>]. Venice, Aldus, 1502-1503. 17th cent. vellum. Estimate €3,000-5,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> GIEGHER. <i>Le Tre trattati</i>. Padova, 1639. Contemporary binding. Estimate €8,000-12,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> ROLEWINCK. <i>Fasciculus temporum</i>. Lyon, Huss, 1496. From the Seillières collection. Estimate €4,000-6,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> AMUS. <i>32 autograph letters to Liliane Choucroun</i>. 1936-1952.<br>Estimate €60,000-80,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> LA FONTAINE. <i>Fables</i>. 1668. Morocco by Bedford. First collective edition. Estimate €6,000-8,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> ROUAULT. <i>Cirque de l’étoile filante</i>. Ambroise Vollard, 1938. Fine binding by Creuzevault. Copy on Japon Impérial. Estimate €30,000-50,000
  • <b>19th Century Shop</b>. 30th anniversary catalogue of landmark rare books, autographs and manuscripts, and historical photographs of all ages.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. <i>The Federalist</i> (1788). An important association copy in original boards, untrimmed.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Isaac Newton. <i>Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica</i> (1687).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Important Age of Discovery manuscript (1512) with Christopher Columbus content.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Shakespeare's <i>Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies</i> (1632).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. John Rockefeller. Ambrotype, the earliest known photograph of Rockefeller.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Muybridge, <i>Animal Locomotion</i> (1887) subscriber's copy.

AE Monthly

Reviews - November - 2009 Issue

Important Signed Documents from the Raab Collection

Jacksonindianplea

Andrew Jackson's appeal to the Indians to leave their ancestral homelands.


Item 21 is a very important, recently discovered item of American history. It is a letter previously known only in draft form from President Andrew Jackson concerning the removal of America's southern Indians to lands west of the Mississippi. It is an early attempt by Jackson to cajole the Indians into moving voluntarily. Jackson plays the role of benevolent father, trying to preserve their way of life and save them from white settlers. As we now know, when Jackson was unable to cajole them into leaving, he was quite willing to use force to remove them from their homelands. This letter is dated October 15, 1829. It is written to Major David Halley, who was his representative to the Choctaw and Chickasaw nations. In it Jackson explains the message he wants relayed to these tribes. Jackson instructs Haley, "say to them as friends and brothers to listen [to] the voice of their father, & friend. Where [they] now are, they and my white children are too near each other to live in harmony & peace." However, Jackson continues, he has provided land for them on the other side of the Mississippi upon which whites have no claim, "and they & their children can live upon [it as] long as grass grows or water runs, in peace and plenty. It shall be theirs forever." Continuing in a paternalistic tone, Jackson instructs, "Say to my red Choctaw children, and my Chickasaw children to listen." He explains that if they remain, they will be subject to the laws of the states of Mississippi and Alabama, not the laws of their own nation. He next claims that he is powerless to stop the states from exercising this control, "...that so far from the United States having a right to question the authority of any State to regulate its affairs within its own limits, they will be obliged to sustain the exercise of this right." As Raab notes, this is a most interesting claim from Jackson, as the Indians were granted this land for their own nations by federal treaty, and Jackson would have no problem enforcing federal authority over the internal affairs of a state a few years later during the Nullification Crisis. However, Jackson repeatedly proclaims to be the Indians' friend and father, playing the role of someone who wants to preserve their nations, but won't be able to protect them unless they cooperate by agreeing to move. As we know, when most refused to move voluntarily, they were forced to do so, and the lands promised to be "theirs forever" would similarly be taken away only a few decades later. $90,000.

It is unusual to see someone run for president as a nonpartisan, even more unusual for such a person to actually mean it. Zachary Taylor was such a candidate, and in 1848, that approach had enough public appeal to get him elected. The Whigs were facing a difficult election in 1848, having opposed the recently concluded and popular Mexican War, and their most likely candidate, Henry Clay, had already lost a couple of times before. So they turned to Taylor, a non-politician who, as a general and hero of the Mexican War, could neutralize objections to their opposition to the war. Taylor agreed to run, but made it clear he would not be beholden to any Whig doctrines, only to his own beliefs. On March 26, 1848, when his name was being bandied about as a potential Whig candidate, Taylor wrote a letter to Dr. John Kearsley Mitchell of Philadelphia. Writes Taylor, "If honored by election to the Presidency I will strive to execute with fidelity the trust reposed in me, uncommitted to the principles of either party." Taylor lived up to that pledge, unwilling to follow anyone's party line or compromise his way to consensus. However, he died only a little over a year in office, and unlike Taylor, his successors attempted to compromise their way out of the North-South, slave/free issue, only to aggravate the problem beyond repair. Item 22. $7,200

You may reach The Raab Collection at 800-977-8333. Their website is www.raabcollection.com.

AE Monthly


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