• <b>Bonhams New York, FINE BOOKS & MANUSCRIPTS, 10 Dec 2014.</b>
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 5. FESTBUCH: Procession Following Charles V's Coronation as Holy Roman Emperor by Pope Clement<br>VII. Est. $120,000-180,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 6. GUTENBERG BIBLE. [Bible in Latin. Mainz: Johann Gutenberg and Fust, 1455.] Est. $40,000-60,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 21. CORONELLI, VICENZO MARIA.<br>1650-1718. [Atlante Veneto.]<br> Est. $25,000-30,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 33. GIGAULT DE LA SALLE, ACHILLE ÉTIENNE. 1772-1840. Voyage pittoresque en Sicile. Est. $25,000-35,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 50. ROTTERDAM. [DE HOOGHE, ROMEYN, AND JOANNES DE VOU.] Album.<br>Est. $50,000-70,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 77. JOSEPH, MICHAEL. A Book of Cats. Covici Friede, 1930. Est. $20,000-30,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 124. DICKENS, CHARLES. 1812-1870. The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club. Est. $20,000-25,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 145. SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM. 1564-1616. Shakespear's Comedies, Histories and Tragedies. Est. $40,000-60,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 160. JOYCE, JAMES. 1882-1941. Pomes Penyeach. Paris: Obelisk Press. [September] 1932. Est. $45,000-75,000.
  • <b>19th Century Shop</b>. 30th anniversary catalogue of landmark rare books, autographs and manuscripts, and historical photographs of all ages.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Abraham Lincoln, "a previously unknown portrait of exceptional quality." From the collection of John Hay.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. <i>The Federalist</i> (1788). An important association copy in original boards, untrimmed.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Isaac Newton. <i>Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica</i> (1687).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Shakespeare's <i>Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies</i> (1632).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. John Rockefeller. Ambrotype, the earliest known photograph of Rockefeller.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Muybridge, <i>Animal Locomotion</i> (1887) subscriber's copy.
  • <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 7: A collection of letters and documents of Scottish industrialist & politician<br>D. J. Macdonald, 1922–1939.<br>£3,000–5,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 9: MARCONI WIRELESS TELEGRAPH COMPANY – A collection of material relating to the evolution of broadcasting in the early 20th century. £3,000–5,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 27: Francesco Maurolico (1494–1575). <i>Martyrologium … Francisci Maurolyci … multo quam antea purgatum, & locupletatum</i>. Venice: Lucas Antonius Giunta, 1568. £6,000–9,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 39: Henry Purcell (1659–1695). <i>Orpheus Britannicus</i>. A Collection of all the Choicest Songs for One, Two, and Three Voices. London: for Henry Playford, 1698–1702. £3,000–5,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 111: Abraham Ortelius (1527–1598). <i>Theatrum oder Schwabüch des Erdtkreijs</i>. Antwerp: [Jan Baptist Vrients], 1602. £10,000–15,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 138: W. L. Wyllie and H. W. Brewer. <i>Bird's Eye View of London as seen from a balloon</i>. London: The Graphic, 1884. £3,000–5,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 202: John Speed (1552–1629). <i>The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine</i>. London, 1627–[46]. £15,000–25,000
  • <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Bill Wilson, Alcoholics Anonymous. Stunning first edition in original dust jacket.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Valentine Davies, Miracle on 34th Street. A holiday favorite.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility. Austen’s first published novel.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Seeking to purchase fine books and collections.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Jack Kerouac, On the Road. The Beat generation bible.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Print catalogues regularly issued, call or email for a copy.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman. An exceptional first edition.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace. Rare London edition, the first in English.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> William Wordsworth, Poems. In a charming full-morocco binding.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Print catalogues regularly issued, call or email for a copy.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451. In the publisher’s asbestos binding.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Cormac McCarthy, Blood Meridian. McCarthy’s best book.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Hound of the Baskervilles. A Fine copy.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Seeking to purchase fine books and collections.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Robert Bloch, Psycho. A lovely copy of a fragile book.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Roald Dahl, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. A perennial favorite.

AE Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - November - 2008 Issue

Inexpensive Americana from David Lesser Antiquarian Books

Lesserin3

Inexpensive Americana from David M. Lesser.


By Michael Stillman

David M. Lesser Fine Antiquarian Books has issued their third catalogue of Inexpensive Americana. Not that Lesser's material is generally very expensive, it's just that nothing in this catalogue of 18th and 19th Americana is priced over $250. Otherwise, this is a typical Lesser catalogue, filled with pamphlets discussing the burning issues of the day. As usual, Lesser gives us a look at America as it once was, and sometimes still is. Here are a few examples.

This is an item filled with irony for the election year of 2008: Dangers of the Republican Governments of the United States, an address given by Daniel Agnew at Roanoke College in Virginia on June 15, 1881. According to Agnew, a Pennsylvania Democrat, the danger of the Republicans is their willingness to extend the right to vote to blacks. What would he think of his party today? Item 2. Priced at $75.

Who could be more forgotten by time than past vice-presidents? The answer is... losing vice-presidential candidates. They certainly are fodder for a catalogue of inexpensive Americana. However, that does not mean they weren't interesting characters in their day. Item 77 is The Charles F. Adams Platform, or a Looking Glass for the Worthies of the Buffalo Convention. Adams was the vice-presidential nominee of the Free Soil Party, a third party headed by former President Martin Van Buren in 1848. They did not seriously contend, but may have drawn off enough Democratic votes to enable Whig Zachary Taylor to win the election. The writer of this pamphlet ridicules Van Buren for changing positions, and mocks Adams as "...cold, selfish, austere and vinegar-like, in the remains of American aristocracy, dying out and tapering off in the third generation." The "third generation" reference pertains to Adams being the son of President John Quincy Adams and grandson of President John Adams. For all the ridicule, Charles Francis Adams would end up serving his country later in a major role. He was U.S. Ambassador to England during the Civil War, and was instrumental in convincing the British not to side with the Confederacy. $250.

Item 131 is The Probable Destiny of Our Country; the Requisites to Fulfill that Destiny; and the Duty of Georgia in the Premises... This was a patriotic address given in 1847 by Georgia attorney Herschel V. Johnson. Johnson spoke of the unique character of American institutions and how they were superior to those of Europe. Unfortunately, those institutions would break down a few years later. Johnson served as Governor of Georgia in the 1850s, and in 1860, he was tapped by Stephen A. Douglas to be the Democratic nominee for vice-president. Douglas hoped the pro-Union southerner Johnson would help him carry the South, and with it the election. Such was not to be, and while Johnson opposed secession at Georgia's secession convention, he was loyal to his home state once the deal was sealed, and became a Confederate senator. It is interesting to note that the forgotten Herschel Johnson would likely be a well-remembered man today if Douglas had won that election. Douglas died just a few months after he would have been sworn into office. Hershel, rather than Andrew Johnson would have been the 17th president. $250.

AE Monthly


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