• <b>Bonhams New York, FINE BOOKS & MANUSCRIPTS, 10 Dec 2014.</b>
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 5. FESTBUCH: Procession Following Charles V's Coronation as Holy Roman Emperor by Pope Clement<br>VII. Est. $120,000-180,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 6. GUTENBERG BIBLE. [Bible in Latin. Mainz: Johann Gutenberg and Fust, 1455.] Est. $40,000-60,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 21. CORONELLI, VICENZO MARIA.<br>1650-1718. [Atlante Veneto.]<br> Est. $25,000-30,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 33. GIGAULT DE LA SALLE, ACHILLE ÉTIENNE. 1772-1840. Voyage pittoresque en Sicile. Est. $25,000-35,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 50. ROTTERDAM. [DE HOOGHE, ROMEYN, AND JOANNES DE VOU.] Album.<br>Est. $50,000-70,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 77. JOSEPH, MICHAEL. A Book of Cats. Covici Friede, 1930. Est. $20,000-30,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 124. DICKENS, CHARLES. 1812-1870. The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club. Est. $20,000-25,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 145. SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM. 1564-1616. Shakespear's Comedies, Histories and Tragedies. Est. $40,000-60,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 160. JOYCE, JAMES. 1882-1941. Pomes Penyeach. Paris: Obelisk Press. [September] 1932. Est. $45,000-75,000.
  • <b>19th Century Shop</b>. 30th anniversary catalogue of landmark rare books, autographs and manuscripts, and historical photographs of all ages.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Abraham Lincoln, "a previously unknown portrait of exceptional quality." From the collection of John Hay.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. <i>The Federalist</i> (1788). An important association copy in original boards, untrimmed.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Isaac Newton. <i>Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica</i> (1687).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Shakespeare's <i>Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies</i> (1632).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. John Rockefeller. Ambrotype, the earliest known photograph of Rockefeller.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Muybridge, <i>Animal Locomotion</i> (1887) subscriber's copy.
  • <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 7: A collection of letters and documents of Scottish industrialist & politician<br>D. J. Macdonald, 1922–1939.<br>£3,000–5,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 9: MARCONI WIRELESS TELEGRAPH COMPANY – A collection of material relating to the evolution of broadcasting in the early 20th century. £3,000–5,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 27: Francesco Maurolico (1494–1575). <i>Martyrologium … Francisci Maurolyci … multo quam antea purgatum, & locupletatum</i>. Venice: Lucas Antonius Giunta, 1568. £6,000–9,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 39: Henry Purcell (1659–1695). <i>Orpheus Britannicus</i>. A Collection of all the Choicest Songs for One, Two, and Three Voices. London: for Henry Playford, 1698–1702. £3,000–5,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 111: Abraham Ortelius (1527–1598). <i>Theatrum oder Schwabüch des Erdtkreijs</i>. Antwerp: [Jan Baptist Vrients], 1602. £10,000–15,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 138: W. L. Wyllie and H. W. Brewer. <i>Bird's Eye View of London as seen from a balloon</i>. London: The Graphic, 1884. £3,000–5,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 202: John Speed (1552–1629). <i>The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine</i>. London, 1627–[46]. £15,000–25,000
  • <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Bill Wilson, Alcoholics Anonymous. Stunning first edition in original dust jacket.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Valentine Davies, Miracle on 34th Street. A holiday favorite.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility. Austen’s first published novel.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Seeking to purchase fine books and collections.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Jack Kerouac, On the Road. The Beat generation bible.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Print catalogues regularly issued, call or email for a copy.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman. An exceptional first edition.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace. Rare London edition, the first in English.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> William Wordsworth, Poems. In a charming full-morocco binding.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Print catalogues regularly issued, call or email for a copy.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451. In the publisher’s asbestos binding.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Cormac McCarthy, Blood Meridian. McCarthy’s best book.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Hound of the Baskervilles. A Fine copy.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Seeking to purchase fine books and collections.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Robert Bloch, Psycho. A lovely copy of a fragile book.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Roald Dahl, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. A perennial favorite.

AE Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - May - 2008 Issue

Important Civil War Documents and Items from Seth Kaller

Kaller

Civil War Catalog from Seth Kaller.


By Michael Stillman

This month we received our first catalogue from Seth Kaller, Inc., Civil War Catalogue. Offered is a collection of truly exceptional items. Here you will find handwritten Lincoln papers, and not just obscure personnel appointments but important historical documents. There are also items written by or related to Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, and John Brown as he prepared for his raid at Harper's Ferry. In addition, there are non-written ephemeral items such as the 36-star American flag which flew over Richmond shortly after its capture, a Confederate physician's kit, a field surgeon's kit (you don't want to face surgery using one of these), signed photographs of Jefferson and Varina Davis, a Tiffany and Co. silk flag banner presented to Union General John Dix for preventing draft riots in New York, a profile of Abraham Lincoln cast from metal retrieved from the sunken USS Cumberland, and an inkwell in the shape of an elephant that stood on President Grant's desk in the White House. Here are some of the other pieces to be found in this magnificent Civil War collection.

On December 8, 1863, President Lincoln issued an amnesty to all Confederate soldiers and citizens, except Confederate government officials and certain military officers and those who mistreated imprisoned Black soldiers. The amnesty provided that if they swore allegiance to the United States government and supported all of its laws, they would have all of their property rights restored, except property interests in former slaves. Lincoln had hoped the amnesty would encourage Confederate fighting soldiers to abandon their units and rejoin the Union. However, what he found was that too many of the soldiers who took advantage of the offer were those already captured and in northern prisons, rather than those carrying on the war. So, Lincoln sat down and wrote in his hand this document, a draft of the revised amnesty proclamation which says this amnesty is not available to persons already under the custody of the United States unless granted special clemency by the President. Price on request.

Two days prior to writing this letter, John Brown met with noted abolitionist and one-time presidential candidate Gerrit Smith and Frank Sanborn to reveal his plans to raid the federal arsenal at Harper's Ferry. Brown hoped he could spark a slave uprising if he could supply the arms. The fiery Smith quickly signed on, but Sanborn was reluctant. The result was Brown wrote this letter to Sanborn, encouraging the latter to support his cause. "I expect nothing but to 'endure hardness:" writes Brown, "but I expect to effect a mighty conquest even though it be like the last victory of Samson." While events did not quite unfold as Brown foresaw, he was still quite prophetic. He endured "hardness" and death as did Samson, and while his attempted rebellion did not take hold, it helped lead to the Civil War a short time later where Brown's goal to end slavery came to pass. As for Sanborn, he was convinced, and along with Smith, became one of Brown's "Secret Six" financial backers. After Brown's capture, the Senate attempted to call Sanborn to testify in committee, but he declined to attend, and the court in his hometown of Concord, Massachusetts, refused federal attempts to have him arrested. $44,000.

General George Meade could have been the great Union hero of the Civil War, rather than Grant. He led the battle that turned the course of the war around, the Union victory at Gettysburg. On July 4, 1863, the day after the battle concluded, Mead issued this proclamation of thanks to his troops from the battlefield. This rare document displays the fault that would soon lead to Meade being replaced by Grant as the leader of Union forces. Meade writes, "The privations and fatigue the Army has endured, and the heroic courage and gallantry it has displayed will be matters of history to be ever remembered." However, after these words which seem to presage Lincoln's later Gettysburg address, Mead says, "Our task is not yet accomplished, and the Commanding General looks to the Army for greater efforts to drive from our soil every vestige of the presence of the invader." Therein lies the rub. Meade seemed content to drive the Confederates from northern soil. Lincoln wanted the enemy followed to his home and destroyed. They were not invaders from a foreign land, but rebels from within, the south as much a part of the nation as the north. By the end of the year, Lincoln would put the more aggressive Grant in charge in place of Meade. $27,500.

AE Monthly


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