• <b>Bonhams New York, FINE BOOKS & MANUSCRIPTS, 10 Dec 2014.</b>
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 5. FESTBUCH: Procession Following Charles V's Coronation as Holy Roman Emperor by Pope Clement<br>VII. Est. $120,000-180,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 6. GUTENBERG BIBLE. [Bible in Latin. Mainz: Johann Gutenberg and Fust, 1455.] Est. $40,000-60,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 21. CORONELLI, VICENZO MARIA.<br>1650-1718. [Atlante Veneto.]<br> Est. $25,000-30,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 33. GIGAULT DE LA SALLE, ACHILLE ÉTIENNE. 1772-1840. Voyage pittoresque en Sicile. Est. $25,000-35,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 50. ROTTERDAM. [DE HOOGHE, ROMEYN, AND JOANNES DE VOU.] Album.<br>Est. $50,000-70,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 77. JOSEPH, MICHAEL. A Book of Cats. Covici Friede, 1930. Est. $20,000-30,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 124. DICKENS, CHARLES. 1812-1870. The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club. Est. $20,000-25,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 145. SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM. 1564-1616. Shakespear's Comedies, Histories and Tragedies. Est. $40,000-60,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 160. JOYCE, JAMES. 1882-1941. Pomes Penyeach. Paris: Obelisk Press. [September] 1932. Est. $45,000-75,000.
  • <b>19th Century Shop</b>. 30th anniversary catalogue of landmark rare books, autographs and manuscripts, and historical photographs of all ages.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Abraham Lincoln, "a previously unknown portrait of exceptional quality." From the collection of John Hay.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. <i>The Federalist</i> (1788). An important association copy in original boards, untrimmed.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Isaac Newton. <i>Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica</i> (1687).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Shakespeare's <i>Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies</i> (1632).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. John Rockefeller. Ambrotype, the earliest known photograph of Rockefeller.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Muybridge, <i>Animal Locomotion</i> (1887) subscriber's copy.
  • <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 7: A collection of letters and documents of Scottish industrialist & politician<br>D. J. Macdonald, 1922–1939.<br>£3,000–5,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 9: MARCONI WIRELESS TELEGRAPH COMPANY – A collection of material relating to the evolution of broadcasting in the early 20th century. £3,000–5,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 27: Francesco Maurolico (1494–1575). <i>Martyrologium … Francisci Maurolyci … multo quam antea purgatum, & locupletatum</i>. Venice: Lucas Antonius Giunta, 1568. £6,000–9,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 39: Henry Purcell (1659–1695). <i>Orpheus Britannicus</i>. A Collection of all the Choicest Songs for One, Two, and Three Voices. London: for Henry Playford, 1698–1702. £3,000–5,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 111: Abraham Ortelius (1527–1598). <i>Theatrum oder Schwabüch des Erdtkreijs</i>. Antwerp: [Jan Baptist Vrients], 1602. £10,000–15,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 138: W. L. Wyllie and H. W. Brewer. <i>Bird's Eye View of London as seen from a balloon</i>. London: The Graphic, 1884. £3,000–5,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 202: John Speed (1552–1629). <i>The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine</i>. London, 1627–[46]. £15,000–25,000
  • <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Bill Wilson, Alcoholics Anonymous. Stunning first edition in original dust jacket.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Valentine Davies, Miracle on 34th Street. A holiday favorite.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility. Austen’s first published novel.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Seeking to purchase fine books and collections.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Jack Kerouac, On the Road. The Beat generation bible.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Print catalogues regularly issued, call or email for a copy.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman. An exceptional first edition.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace. Rare London edition, the first in English.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> William Wordsworth, Poems. In a charming full-morocco binding.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Print catalogues regularly issued, call or email for a copy.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451. In the publisher’s asbestos binding.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Cormac McCarthy, Blood Meridian. McCarthy’s best book.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Hound of the Baskervilles. A Fine copy.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Seeking to purchase fine books and collections.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Robert Bloch, Psycho. A lovely copy of a fragile book.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Roald Dahl, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. A perennial favorite.

AE Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - October - 2006 Issue

Six Hundred (almost) Children's Books from Aleph-Bet

Popeye

Popeye takes on the savage white people.


Dick and Jane led to a revolution in reading. The Thomas Jefferson of this revolution was Dr. Seuss. He figured you could better teach children to read by making the books fun. In 1957 he published the classic The Cat in the Hat, labeled "for beginning readers." Seuss wrote using the minimal vocabulary the young would be able to read while making the story fun, that is, making the children want to read it. Within a few years, the Cat and his progeny would bury the insipid Dick and Jane and Spot too. They are not missed. Item 504 is a first edition of the "Cat." $8,500.

Here is another book for beginning readers, I Wish that I had Duck Feet, by Theo LeSieg. LeSieg? Who is this Frenchman? It's a trick. Do you see? Dr. Seuss' actual name was not Dr. Seuss. It was Theodore Geisel. Geisel. LeSieg. Now you get it. Theo LeSieg was really Dr. Seuss, who was really Theodore Geisel. And to think, all of this happened on Mulberry Street. Item 507. $1,500.

There is one aspect to children's books that is not so much fun, and yet it is a stark and realistic look at attitudes of the day. That is how minorities, and Blacks in particular, are portrayed. Some books are downright ugly. There is the 10 Little Negroes, a book with its title cleaned up, but with the pejorative still used throughout the text. This 1944 edition uses the ugliest of stereotypical drawings to portray the Black family. If you think this is strictly an American issue, be notified this book was published in London. Item 88. $500. Other versions of this tale don't even bother to cleanse the "N" word in their titles. A 1950 edition uses the "N" word in the title, yet it surprisingly uses normal, positive drawings to depict the black children, rather than ugly stereotypes. Item 90. $225.

Then there is the most notable of all, Helen Bannerman's Little Black Sambo. Bannerman lived in India, and Sambo was something of a clever child, not a negative characterization. Still, racial stereotypes infiltrate these books, creating an unhelpful image Ms. Bannerman probably never intended. Even Babar (no, not Babar!), the beloved French elephant engaged in some racial stereotyping in his Pique-Nique Chez Babar. Well, let's blame author Laurent de Brunhoff for that, not Babar. Finally, there are titles like Langston Hughes' The First Book of Negroes, or Emma Akin's A Booker T. Washington School, which attempted to help black children develop a positive self-image in a world throwing negative stereotypes their way.

Here is a surprising about-face from the usual stereotype. Blacks and Indians have long been portrayed as "savages" in western books. So give Popeye credit for balance in his 1934 book, Popeye Among the White Savages. Perhaps this isn't fair either, though in 1934, some of the worst savages ever known to man were coming to power in the white continent of Europe. Go get 'em, Popeye! Sadly, we must report that Popeye passed away recently from e coli poisoning. Item 437. $900.

Aleph-Bet Books may be found online at www.alephbet.com, phone number 914-764-7410.

AE Monthly


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