• <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> FIRE OF LONDON. A True Pourtraict with a Brief Description Of that Deplorable Fire of London.<br>US$ 6,000 - 8,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> MATHER, INCREASE. A Brief History of the Warr With the Indians in New-England. US$ 25,000 - 35,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> SALEM WITCH TRIALS. Manuscript Document variously signed. US$ 8,000 - 12,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> REVERE, PAUL. The Bloody Massacre perpetrated in King-Street Boston. US$ 25,000 - 35,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> DRURY, JOTHAM. PLANNING THE BOSTON TEA PARTY. Autograph Document Signed. US$ 25,000 - 35,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> LEXINGTON AND CONCORD. Bloody Butchery by the British Troops. US$ 25,000 - 35,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. The New-England Chronicle. US$ 50,000 - 70,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> CORINTH, MISSISSIPPI IN 1862. Albumen print photograph. US$ 1,000 - 1,500.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION. By the President of the United States. US$ 15,000 - 20,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> [EDISON, THOMAS ALVA. 1847-1931.] Engraved $1 Bill, Endorsed and Signed by Charles L. Clarke on face. US$ 8,000 - 12,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> BASEBALL. Boston Union Athletic Exhibition Company Grounds. US$ 15,000 - 25,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> CASSIDY, BUTCH. Carte-de-visite police photograph.<br>US$ 20,000 - 30,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> [BUFFALO BILL.] <i>The Great Train Hold-Up & Bandit Hunters of the Union Pacific</i>. US$ 3,000 - 5,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> MCCLELLAND, GEORGE WILLIAM. Eniac-Birth Certificate of Computer Age. 1880-1955. Typed Letter Signed. US$ 6,000 - 8,000.
  • <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>F. Scott Fitzgerald. The Great Gatsby. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1925.First edition, first issue in a near fine jacket.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Ernest Hemingway. The Sun Also Rises. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1926. First edition, first issue.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Jack Kerouac. On the Road. New York: Viking, 1957. First edition, presentation copy.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>JRR Tolkien. The Hobbit. London: George Allen & Unwin, Ltd., 1937. First edition, fine copy in jacket.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Vladimir Nabokov. Lolita. Paris: the Olympia Press, 1955. First edition presentation copy inscribed on the half-title.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Tennessee Williams. A Streetcar Named Desire. Norfolk, CT: New Directions, 1947. Inscribed by Tennesee Williams and Director Elia Kazan with additional inscriptions or signatures by all the cast members.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>T.S. Eliot. The Waste Land. Richmond, Surrey: Printed and published by Leonard and Virignia Woolf, 1923. First English edition, nscribed to Eliot’s patroness Lady Mary Lilian Rothermere.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Ernest Hemingway. Three Stories and Ten Poems. Paris: Contact Publishing Co., 1923. A mint first edition presentation copy of Hemingway’s landmark first book.
    <b>Sotheby's New York, 1 April 2014: </b> A Modern Library: The Gordon Waldorf Collection.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>William Faulkner. Light in August. New York: Harrison Smith & Robert Haas, 1932. First edition inscribed to Myrtle Ramey.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>James Joyce. Ulysses. Paris: Shakespeare & Co, 1922. First edition, one of 150 press-numbered copies on vergé d’Arches.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>F. Scott Fitzgerald. This Side of Paradise. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1920. First edition with jacket in fine condition.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Dashiell Hammett. The Thin Man. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, MCMXXXIV. First American edition. A presentation copy inscribed.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Raymond Chandler. Farewell, My Lovely. New York: Knopf, 1940. First edition presentation copy, being a copy that Chandler originally retained, inscribed on the front endpaper.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>J.D. Salinger. The Catcher in the Rye. Boston: Little, Brown, & Co., 1951. First edition.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Anthony Burgess. A Clockwork Orange. London: Heinemann, 1962. First edition and a rare presentation copy inscribed by the author.
  • <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> DALI, BRETON, V. HUGO and GALA. <i>Surrealist portrait of Lenin</i>. 1932. Cadavre exquis signed by all four. On a postcard addressed to René Char. Estimate €15,000-20,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> CELINE. <i>Voyage au bout de la nuit</i>. One of 20 copies on vélin d’Arches, inscribed to Roland Saucier and a binding by A. Cerutti. Estimate €80,000-120,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> PROUST. <i>Autograph letter to Gaston Gallimard</i>, about the Jeunes filles en fleurs and his dreyffusian past. December 21, 1919. 4 pages. Estimate €10,000-15,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> REVERDY. <i>La Lucarne ovale. 1916</i>. First edition. One of 6 copies on Japan paper. Binding by Jean de Gonet. With a letter by Pierre Albert-Birot. Estimate €28,000-35,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> STENDHAL. <i>Histoire de la Peinture en Italie</i>. 1817. First edition, inscribed to count Kosakowsky.<br>Estimate €20,000-30,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> BAUDELAIRE. Théophile Gautier. 1859. Exceptional copy with contemporary binding, inscribed to Edouard Manet.<br>Estimate €40,000-60,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> OVIDIUS. [<i>Complete works</i>]. Venice, Aldus, 1502-1503. 17th cent. vellum. Estimate €3,000-5,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> GIEGHER. <i>Le Tre trattati</i>. Padova, 1639. Contemporary binding. Estimate €8,000-12,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> ROLEWINCK. <i>Fasciculus temporum</i>. Lyon, Huss, 1496. From the Seillières collection. Estimate €4,000-6,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> AMUS. <i>32 autograph letters to Liliane Choucroun</i>. 1936-1952.<br>Estimate €60,000-80,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> LA FONTAINE. <i>Fables</i>. 1668. Morocco by Bedford. First collective edition. Estimate €6,000-8,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> ROUAULT. <i>Cirque de l’étoile filante</i>. Ambroise Vollard, 1938. Fine binding by Creuzevault. Copy on Japon Impérial. Estimate €30,000-50,000
  • <b>19th Century Shop</b>. 30th anniversary catalogue of landmark rare books, autographs and manuscripts, and historical photographs of all ages.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. <i>The Federalist</i> (1788). An important association copy in original boards, untrimmed.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Isaac Newton. <i>Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica</i> (1687).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Important Age of Discovery manuscript (1512) with Christopher Columbus content.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Shakespeare's <i>Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies</i> (1632).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. John Rockefeller. Ambrotype, the earliest known photograph of Rockefeller.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Muybridge, <i>Animal Locomotion</i> (1887) subscriber's copy.

AE Monthly

Reviews - September - 2006 Issue

The South, Slavery, and More from David Lesser Antiquarian Books

Lesser92

The South, Slavery...etc. from David M. Lesser.


By Michael Stillman

The latest catalogue from David Lesser Fine Antiquarian Books is headed The South, Slavery, The Civil War, Reconstruction, Afro-Americana. Lesser has a knack for finding material that truly reflects its time. This catalogue is filled with the debates that took place in 19th century America, and many pertained to the most contentious and difficult issue the nation faced - slavery. The ringing words of northern abolitionists, the increasingly strident defenses of the "peculiar institution" from the South, and even the pleas of the middle-of-the-roaders who tried to find some sort of compromise, are all heard in these documents. As you read through the descriptions of so many of these works, it is hard not to feel the impending doom, a nation headed toward a cataclysmic disaster, a split so deep that nothing but brute force could ever resolve the differences. Lesser offers not just a collection of books, but a look at America dealing with an irresolvable conflict. Here are a few examples.

Item 7 is a perverse message of "hope" for slaves written by Thomas Bacon in the colonial era. It would be here reprinted in 1842 for the "Society for the Advancement of Christianity in South Carolina." The aim of this so-called "Christian" society was to convince slaves that it was in their own best interests to passively accept their fate. The book's title is Sermons by the Rev. Thomas Bacon, of Maryland, First Published in 1763. On the Duties of Servants. Bacon's thesis was that slaves were serving God just as well as the most important of leaders, and God appreciated their labors equally. Nonetheless, being slaves was the role they had been called to, and therefore they should obediently serve their masters as they would serve God. "Poor creatures! You little consider, when you are idle and neglectful of your master's business...what faults you are guilty of towards your masters and mistresses are faults against God himself." Unlike the typical slaveholder, Bacon educated his slaves, quite progressive and humanitarian for his era, and yet he hoped to use that education to convince slaves to be accepting of their status, rather than seek freedom. Priced at $500.

Popular sovereignty was a pre-war doctrine made famous by Stephen A. Douglas, Abraham Lincoln's noted protagonist. In the two decades before the Civil War, the burning issue was whether slavery would be permitted in new states being formed in the West. Popular sovereignty would have allowed residents of these states to decide for themselves, thereby avoiding rancorous fights in Congress. However, while Douglas is most associated with the principle, it was the basis of Lewis Cass's 1848 candidacy for the presidency. Democrat Cass, like Douglas, hoped to be all things to all people with this compromise. However, Whig candidate Zachary Taylor did Cass one better in being all things to all people, simply refusing to enunciate positions on the major issues of the day. Voters on all sides of the spectrum could imagine Taylor shared their own views, so they elected him over Cass. Item 39 is General Cass on the Wilmot Proviso. Cass opposed the Wilmot Proviso, which would have banned slavery in territories obtained from the Mexican Cession, in favor of popular sovereignty. His position antagonized many northern Democrats, some of whom defected to the new Free Soil party, helping assure Cass' defeat. $350.

AE Monthly


Review Search

Archived Reviews

Ask Questions