• <b>Bonhams 4 June 2014:</b> China: The Camera Collection. An extensive collection of material from archives of John David Zumbrun and Camera Craft. Sold for US$ 317,000 inc. premium
    <b>Bonhams 4 June 2014:</b> Chernikhov, Yakov Geogievich. 1889-1951. <i>Architectural Cycles</i>. Sold for US$ 425,000 inc. premium
    <b>Bonhams 4 June 2014:</b> Turing, Alan Mathison. 1912-1954. On Computable Numbers, Application to the Entscheidungsproblem. Sold for US$ 50,000 inc. premium
    <b>Bonhams 4 June 2014:</b> CHERNIKHOV, YAKOV GEORGIEVICH. 1889-1951. Sold for US$ 173,000 inc. premium
    <b>Bonhams 4 June 2014:</b> GÖDEL, KURT. On Undecidable Propositions of Formal Mathematical Systems. Sold for US$ 47,500 inc. premium
    <b>Bonhams 4 June 2014:</b> FEYNMAN, RICHARD and LARRY GROBEL. Original Cassette Tape of an interview of Nobel prize winning physicist. Sold for US$ 37,500 inc. premium
    <b>Bonhams 5 June 2014:</b> A D-Day 48 star Ensign flown from LST-493, 6th June 1944. Sold for US$ 386,500 inc. premium
    <b>Bonhams 5 June 2014:</b> A Rare Enigma three rotor Enciphering Machine Germany circa 1942-44. Sold for US$ 92,500 inc. premium
    <b>Bonhams 5 June 2014:</b> Anonymous, alithographic poster, 1939. Sold for US$ 27,500 inc. premium
  • <b>Leslie Hindman Auctioneers:<br>Sale 322 - Fine Books and Manuscripts, August 6th.</b>
    <b>Leslie Hindman Auctioneers August 6th:</b> Lot 8. MACKENZIE, Alexander. <i>Voyages from Montreal</i>. London, 1801. First edition. Est. $3-5,000.
    <b>Leslie Hindman Auctioneers August 6th:</b> Lot 27. AUDUBON, John James. <i>The Birds of America</i>. New York and Philadelphia, [1839], 1840-1844. Est. $30-50,000.
    <b>Leslie Hindman Auctioneers August 6th:</b> AUDUBON, John James and John BACHMAN. <i>Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America</i>. New York, 1845-1848. 3 vols. Elephant folio edition. Est. $200-400,000.
    <b>Leslie Hindman Auctioneers:<br>Sale 322 - Fine Books and Manuscripts, August 6th.</b>
    <b>Leslie Hindman Auctioneers August 6th:</b> GREW, Nehemiah. <i>The Anatomy of Plants</i>. London, 1862. First edition. Est.: $1,500-2,500.
    <b>Leslie Hindman Auctioneers August 6th:</b> APIANUS, Petrus. <i>Cosmographia</i>. Cologne, 1574. With 5 plates, 4 with volvelles. Est. $7-9,000.
    <b>Leslie Hindman Auctioneers August 6th:</b> SMITH, Adam. <i>An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations</i>. London, 1776. 2 vols. First edition. Est. $60-80,000.
    <b>Leslie Hindman Auctioneers August 6th:</b> (LOUIS-PHILIPPE I) MCKENNEY AND HALL. <i>History of the Indian Tribes of North America</i>. Philadelphia, 1838, 1844. 3 vols. King Louis-Philippe I copy. Est. $140-180,000.
    <b>Leslie Hindman Auctioneers August 6th:</b> GREENER, Richard. Diploma of first African American man to graduate Harvard College. Est. $10-15,000.
    <b>Leslie Hindman Auctioneers August 6th:</b> (MIRO, Joan) <i>Lithographs I-VI</i>. New York and Paris, 1972, 1975, 1977, 1981 and 1992. 6 vols.<br>Est. $2-4,000.
    <b>Leslie Hindman Auctioneers August 6th:</b> HEMINGWAY, Ernest. <i>A Farewell to Arms</i>. New York, 1929. First edition. Est. $800-1,200.
  • <b>19th Century Shop</b>. 30th anniversary catalogue of landmark rare books, autographs and manuscripts, and historical photographs of all ages.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Abraham Lincoln, "a previously unknown portrait of exceptional quality." From the collection of John Hay.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. <i>The Federalist</i> (1788). An important association copy in original boards, untrimmed.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Isaac Newton. <i>Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica</i> (1687).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Shakespeare's <i>Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies</i> (1632).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. John Rockefeller. Ambrotype, the earliest known photograph of Rockefeller.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Muybridge, <i>Animal Locomotion</i> (1887) subscriber's copy.
  • <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> DALI, BRETON, V. HUGO and GALA. <i>Surrealist portrait of Lenin</i>. 1932. Cadavre exquis signed by all four. On a postcard addressed to René Char. Estimate €15,000-20,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> CELINE. <i>Voyage au bout de la nuit</i>. One of 20 copies on vélin d’Arches, inscribed to Roland Saucier and a binding by A. Cerutti. Estimate €80,000-120,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> PROUST. <i>Autograph letter to Gaston Gallimard</i>, about the Jeunes filles en fleurs and his dreyffusian past. December 21, 1919. 4 pages. Estimate €10,000-15,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> REVERDY. <i>La Lucarne ovale. 1916</i>. First edition. One of 6 copies on Japan paper. Binding by Jean de Gonet. With a letter by Pierre Albert-Birot. Estimate €28,000-35,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> STENDHAL. <i>Histoire de la Peinture en Italie</i>. 1817. First edition, inscribed to count Kosakowsky.<br>Estimate €20,000-30,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> BAUDELAIRE. Théophile Gautier. 1859. Exceptional copy with contemporary binding, inscribed to Edouard Manet.<br>Estimate €40,000-60,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> OVIDIUS. [<i>Complete works</i>]. Venice, Aldus, 1502-1503. 17th cent. vellum. Estimate €3,000-5,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> GIEGHER. <i>Le Tre trattati</i>. Padova, 1639. Contemporary binding. Estimate €8,000-12,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> ROLEWINCK. <i>Fasciculus temporum</i>. Lyon, Huss, 1496. From the Seillières collection. Estimate €4,000-6,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> AMUS. <i>32 autograph letters to Liliane Choucroun</i>. 1936-1952.<br>Estimate €60,000-80,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> LA FONTAINE. <i>Fables</i>. 1668. Morocco by Bedford. First collective edition. Estimate €6,000-8,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> ROUAULT. <i>Cirque de l’étoile filante</i>. Ambroise Vollard, 1938. Fine binding by Creuzevault. Copy on Japon Impérial. Estimate €30,000-50,000

AE Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - May - 2005 Issue

Autographs, Manuscripts and More of Famous People from The Raab Collection

R0506

Queen Victoria decked out in regal splendour.


Zachary Taylor is one of those forgotten presidents between Jackson and Lincoln, but perhaps the most interesting of them. He was elected in 1848, the first election in which the issue of slavery and North-South differences would become the major concern of the electorate. Taylor won with a message of strong principles while finessing the details of his positions. He was a man with a reputation for honor and integrity, and he was a hero of the Mexican War, but he offered few specifics on the issues of the day. It was essentially a "trust me or don't vote for me" message. As a slaveholder, supporter of preservation of that institution in the states where it existed, and one not clearly opposed to its extension into new states, he could gather votes in the South. As a strong defender of the Union and one who encouraged rapid addition of new states at a time when they likely would choose to be free, he could carry votes in the North. It was enough to get him elected. However, Taylor would die only a little more than a year into his term, to be succeeded by a series of nonentities, Fillmore, Pierce and Buchanan, who would try to compromise the nation's way out of the coming conflagration, all to no avail. But, one can't help but wonder what would have happened if Taylor had survived, as unlike the presidents (and the congress) which followed him, Taylor was no compromiser. He opposed what became the Compromise of 1850 after his death, which allowed for the slow admission of new states after a territorial stage. He foresaw this as generating enormous battles between pro-free and pro-slavery forces, something which most notably came to pass in "Bleeding Kansas." Instead, he called for immediate drawing of state constitutions and admission of the new territories to the Union, before confrontations could develop, a process which would likely have led to more free states. And, Taylor was an unwavering supporter of the Union, prepared to defend it with whatever means necessary. From the only State of the Union address Taylor lived to present, speaking of the Union, he said, "...its dissolution would be the greatest of calamities..." and, "whatever dangers may threaten it, I shall stand by it and maintain it in its integrity..." Taylor was even more blunt with some southern lawmakers who were speaking of secession. To them he stated that in the event of a secession, he would personally lead the army against the rebels, and that he had no reluctance to hang those in rebellion. Taylor undoubtedly meant what he said. Item 17 is a letter Taylor wrote early in the campaign of 1848, in which he concisely states what in effect was his platform: "If honored by election to the Presidency I will strive to execute with fidelity the trust reposed in me, uncommitted to the principles of either party." $9,000.

Andersonville is perhaps the most notorious name to emerge from the horrors of the Civil War. A Confederate prison for Union soldiers, it more resembled the Nazi concentration camps of the following century than the typical prison. Some 13,000 soldiers died there. The commandant of this prison was one Henry Wirz. When the war ended, Wirz was placed on trial for the atrocities that occurred at Andersonville. However, military trials were generally conducted in secret. For this trial to have a major public impact, the proceedings would have to be open. That decision would have to come from President Andrew Johnson, historically associated with leniency toward the South. Item 28 is a letter from President Johnson to Acting Secretary of War T.J. Eckert allowing publication of the proceedings of the Wirz trial if such is "necessary to a full understanding of the case by the Public..." Those proceedings were made public, Wirz was convicted, and he became the only person executed for war crimes from the Civil War. It remains a debate today whether Wirz was a scapegoat for the horrors of this war or a man justly punished. Johnson's letter is available as item 28 of the Raab catalogue. $11,800.

AE Monthly


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