• <b>Bonhams 28 Oct 2014:</b> The Gemini Collection of Modern Prints and Illustrated Books.
    <b>Bonhams 28 Oct 2014:</b> Lot 48. CHAGALL, MARC. 1887-1985.<br>Est. US$ 300,000-500,000.
    <b>Bonhams 28 Oct 2014:</b> Lot 59. DALI, SALVADOR. SPANISH, 1904-1989. OVID. Est. US$ 8,000-12,000.
    <b>Bonhams 28 Oct 2014:</b> Lot 85. GANYMED. MEIER-GRAEFE, JULIUS, editor. Est. US$ 10,000-15,000.
    <b>Bonhams 28 Oct 2014:</b> Lot 112. MIRÓ, JOAN. SPANISH, 1893-1983. ÉLUARD, PAUL. À toute épreuve.<br>Est. US$ 35,000-55,000.
    <b>Bonhams 22 Oct 2014:</b> Lot 48. KEPLER, JOHANNES. 1571-1630.<br>Est. US$ 25,000-35,000.
    <b>Bonhams 22 Oct 2014:</b> Lot 58. RITCHEY, GEORGE WILLIS. 1864-1945. Est. US$ 450,000-550,000.
    <b>Bonhams 22 Oct 2014:</b> Lot 74. WALLICH, NATHANIEL. 1786-1854. Est. US$ 35,000-55,000.
    <b>Bonhams 22 Oct 2014:</b> Lot 80. DARWIN, CHARLES. 1809-1882. Autograph Letter Signed ("C. Darwin"). Est. US$ 20,000-30,000.
    <b>Bonhams 22 October 2014:</b><br>HISTORY OF SCIENCE.
    <b>Bonhams 22 Oct 2014:</b> Lot 245. HELMHOLTZ SOUND SYNTHESIZER. HELMHOLTZ, HERMANN VON. 1821-1894. Est. US$ 20,000-30,000.
    <b>Bonhams 22 Oct 2014:</b> Lot 262. MANHATTAN PROJECT VIEWING WINDOW. Heavily leaded glass.<br>Est. US$ 150,000-250,000.
    <b>Bonhams 22 Oct 2014:</b> Lot 271. WOVEN SILK PORTRAIT OF JACQUARD. Est. US$ 20,000-30,000.
    <b>Bonhams 22 Oct 2014:</b> Lot 286. APPLE. Apple 1 Motherboard.<br>Est. US$ 300,000-500,000.
  • <b>Archives International October 25 AIA XXI Wall Street Auction Oct-Nov 2014.</b> Sale starts at 10:30 am EST.
    <b>Archives International Oct 25:</b> Lot 15. [Gold Rush] The way they go to California. Est. $2,000-$4,000
    <b>Archives International Oct 25:</b> Lot 24. Missouri Gazette, Tuesday 26, 11808, St. Louis, Louisiana.<br>Est. $400 to $800
    <b>Archives International Oct 25:</b> Lot 73. San Francisco City Stock, 1851 Gold Rush Era Bond. Est. $100-200
    <b>Archives International Oct 25:</b> Lot 334. Lake Ontario, Auburn and New York Railroad Company Stock Certificate – Subscription Agreement. Est. $100 to $200
    <b>Archives International Oct 25:</b> Lot 444. Early Pennsylvania Turnpike Trio ca. 1811 to 1864. Est. $130 to 260
    <b>Archives International November 4 AIA XXI Wall Street Auction Oct-Nov 2014.</b> Sale starts at 10:30 am EST.
    <b>Archives International Nov 4:</b> Lot 950. South Carolina 1778 Colonial Note. Est. $700 to $1,000
    <b>Archives International Nov 4:</b> Lot 951. Virginia Colonial Note, $50 BP15], Fr#VA-162, October 5, 1778, S/N 8633. Est. $200 to $400
    <b>Archives International Nov 4:</b> Lot 952. State of Massachusetts, April 1, 1779 State Lottery Bond.<br> Est. $250 to $500
    <b>Archives International Nov 4:</b> Lot 953. State of Massachusetts, February 5, 1780 State Lottery Bond.<br> Est. $250 to $500
    <b>Archives International Nov 4:</b> Lot 954. Uncut Sheet of East Haddam Obsoletes Higher Denominations.. Est. $150 to $300
    <b>Archives International November 4 AIA XXI Wall Street Auction Oct-Nov 2014.</b> Sale starts at 10:30 am EST.
    <b>Archives International Nov 4:</b> Lot 956. Jasper County, By Order of the Inferior Court, 1862 Obsolete Scrip Note. Est. $100 to $200
    <b>Archives International Nov 4:</b> Lot 963. Kidd’s Purchase Scrip Note Sheet from MD. Est. $400 to $800
    <b>Archives International Nov 4:</b> Lot 966. National Base Ball League, ca. 1880’sAdvertising Note from Minnesota. Est, $800 to $1,600
    <b>Archives International Nov 4:</b> Lot 973. Important Historical Vignette. NY. New York. Nassau Bank. $1. Proof on card. Est. $600 to $1,200
    <b>Archives International Nov 4:</b> Lot 974. Inverted Back Error. F.R.N., Chicago, $10, 1934A, Fr.#2006-G [GA Block]. Est. $1,250 to $2,000
  • <b>Bid now! Auction Ends October 29th.</b>
    <b>Ends Oct 29th oakauctions.com:</b> Daniel Boone autograph. Boon confirms receipt of payment for surveying work. Min Bid $500.
    <b>Ends Oct 29th oakauctions.com:</b> CROCKETT, David (1786-1836). Autograph free frank ("Free D. Crockett") on envelope.<br>Min Bid $500.
    <b>Ends Oct 29th oakauctions.com:</b> James K. Polk Signed "Executive Documents". Min Bid $500.
    <b>Ends Oct 29th oakauctions.com:</b> James Buchanan, Rare Signed Constitutional Law Book.<br>Min Bid $500.
    <b>Ends Oct 29th oakauctions.com:</b> Rare Abraham Lincoln 1841 Legal Document. "Sangamon Circuit Court", dated March 11, 1841. Min Bid $300.
    <b>Bid now! Auction Ends October 29th.</b>
    <b>Ends Oct 29th oakauctions.com:</b> William Mckinley 25th President of the U.S. Historic Signed Photo.<br>Min Bid $200.
    <b>Ends Oct 29th oakauctions.com:</b> William Mckinley 25th President of the U.S. Signed book. Speaches and Addresses, 1894. Min Bid $250.
    <b>Ends Oct 29th oakauctions.com:</b> William Howard Taft 27th President of the U.S. "Ethics in Service", inscribed 1921. Min Bid $250.
    <b>Ends Oct 29th oakauctions.com:</b> John F. Kennedy 35th President of the U.S. Signed image. Min Bid $200.
    <b>Ends Oct 29th oakauctions.com:</b> Historical Oliver Hazard Perry ALS "We Have Defeated The Enemy Completely..." 1812. Min Bid $500.
    <b>Bid now! Auction Ends October 29th.</b>
    <b>Ends Oct 29th oakauctions.com:</b> Certificate of Discharge Edward J. Smith. English naval officer (1850-1912) in command of the RMS Titanic. Min Bid $400.
    <b>Ends Oct 29th oakauctions.com:</b> Charles Dickens Author Letter Signed and Original Photo. Min Bid $400.
    <b>Ends Oct 29th oakauctions.com:</b> Snow White and The Seven Dwarfs. Important Disney original comic art work from this 1937 classic.<br>Min Bid $500.
    <b>Ends Oct 29th oakauctions.com:</b> Signed Certificate for Heroism Rescue for the Akron search and<br>Air Ship AJ3. Min Bid $300.
    <b>Ends Oct 29th oakauctions.com:</b> 1986 STS-51L CHRISTA MCAULIFFE and BARBARA MORGAN SIGNED DISPLAY. Min Bid $400.
    <b>Ends Oct 29th oakauctions.com:</b> 1951 World Series New York Yankees Team Signed Baseball. Featuring the 1951 Bronx Bombers. Min Bid $200.
  • <b>19th Century Shop</b>. 30th anniversary catalogue of landmark rare books, autographs and manuscripts, and historical photographs of all ages.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Abraham Lincoln, "a previously unknown portrait of exceptional quality." From the collection of John Hay.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. <i>The Federalist</i> (1788). An important association copy in original boards, untrimmed.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Isaac Newton. <i>Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica</i> (1687).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Shakespeare's <i>Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies</i> (1632).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. John Rockefeller. Ambrotype, the earliest known photograph of Rockefeller.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Muybridge, <i>Animal Locomotion</i> (1887) subscriber's copy.

AE Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - May - 2005 Issue

Autographs, Manuscripts and More of Famous People from The Raab Collection

R0506

Queen Victoria decked out in regal splendour.


Zachary Taylor is one of those forgotten presidents between Jackson and Lincoln, but perhaps the most interesting of them. He was elected in 1848, the first election in which the issue of slavery and North-South differences would become the major concern of the electorate. Taylor won with a message of strong principles while finessing the details of his positions. He was a man with a reputation for honor and integrity, and he was a hero of the Mexican War, but he offered few specifics on the issues of the day. It was essentially a "trust me or don't vote for me" message. As a slaveholder, supporter of preservation of that institution in the states where it existed, and one not clearly opposed to its extension into new states, he could gather votes in the South. As a strong defender of the Union and one who encouraged rapid addition of new states at a time when they likely would choose to be free, he could carry votes in the North. It was enough to get him elected. However, Taylor would die only a little more than a year into his term, to be succeeded by a series of nonentities, Fillmore, Pierce and Buchanan, who would try to compromise the nation's way out of the coming conflagration, all to no avail. But, one can't help but wonder what would have happened if Taylor had survived, as unlike the presidents (and the congress) which followed him, Taylor was no compromiser. He opposed what became the Compromise of 1850 after his death, which allowed for the slow admission of new states after a territorial stage. He foresaw this as generating enormous battles between pro-free and pro-slavery forces, something which most notably came to pass in "Bleeding Kansas." Instead, he called for immediate drawing of state constitutions and admission of the new territories to the Union, before confrontations could develop, a process which would likely have led to more free states. And, Taylor was an unwavering supporter of the Union, prepared to defend it with whatever means necessary. From the only State of the Union address Taylor lived to present, speaking of the Union, he said, "...its dissolution would be the greatest of calamities..." and, "whatever dangers may threaten it, I shall stand by it and maintain it in its integrity..." Taylor was even more blunt with some southern lawmakers who were speaking of secession. To them he stated that in the event of a secession, he would personally lead the army against the rebels, and that he had no reluctance to hang those in rebellion. Taylor undoubtedly meant what he said. Item 17 is a letter Taylor wrote early in the campaign of 1848, in which he concisely states what in effect was his platform: "If honored by election to the Presidency I will strive to execute with fidelity the trust reposed in me, uncommitted to the principles of either party." $9,000.

Andersonville is perhaps the most notorious name to emerge from the horrors of the Civil War. A Confederate prison for Union soldiers, it more resembled the Nazi concentration camps of the following century than the typical prison. Some 13,000 soldiers died there. The commandant of this prison was one Henry Wirz. When the war ended, Wirz was placed on trial for the atrocities that occurred at Andersonville. However, military trials were generally conducted in secret. For this trial to have a major public impact, the proceedings would have to be open. That decision would have to come from President Andrew Johnson, historically associated with leniency toward the South. Item 28 is a letter from President Johnson to Acting Secretary of War T.J. Eckert allowing publication of the proceedings of the Wirz trial if such is "necessary to a full understanding of the case by the Public..." Those proceedings were made public, Wirz was convicted, and he became the only person executed for war crimes from the Civil War. It remains a debate today whether Wirz was a scapegoat for the horrors of this war or a man justly punished. Johnson's letter is available as item 28 of the Raab catalogue. $11,800.

AE Monthly


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