• <b>Bonhams New York, FINE BOOKS & MANUSCRIPTS, 10 Dec 2014.</b>
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 5. FESTBUCH: Procession Following Charles V's Coronation as Holy Roman Emperor by Pope Clement<br>VII. Est. $120,000-180,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 6. GUTENBERG BIBLE. [Bible in Latin. Mainz: Johann Gutenberg and Fust, 1455.] Est. $40,000-60,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 21. CORONELLI, VICENZO MARIA.<br>1650-1718. [Atlante Veneto.]<br> Est. $25,000-30,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 33. GIGAULT DE LA SALLE, ACHILLE ÉTIENNE. 1772-1840. Voyage pittoresque en Sicile. Est. $25,000-35,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 50. ROTTERDAM. [DE HOOGHE, ROMEYN, AND JOANNES DE VOU.] Album.<br>Est. $50,000-70,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 77. JOSEPH, MICHAEL. A Book of Cats. Covici Friede, 1930. Est. $20,000-30,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 124. DICKENS, CHARLES. 1812-1870. The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club. Est. $20,000-25,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 145. SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM. 1564-1616. Shakespear's Comedies, Histories and Tragedies. Est. $40,000-60,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 160. JOYCE, JAMES. 1882-1941. Pomes Penyeach. Paris: Obelisk Press. [September] 1932. Est. $45,000-75,000.
  • <b>19th Century Shop</b>. 30th anniversary catalogue of landmark rare books, autographs and manuscripts, and historical photographs of all ages.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Abraham Lincoln, "a previously unknown portrait of exceptional quality." From the collection of John Hay.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. <i>The Federalist</i> (1788). An important association copy in original boards, untrimmed.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Isaac Newton. <i>Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica</i> (1687).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Shakespeare's <i>Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies</i> (1632).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. John Rockefeller. Ambrotype, the earliest known photograph of Rockefeller.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Muybridge, <i>Animal Locomotion</i> (1887) subscriber's copy.
  • <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 7: A collection of letters and documents of Scottish industrialist & politician<br>D. J. Macdonald, 1922–1939.<br>£3,000–5,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 9: MARCONI WIRELESS TELEGRAPH COMPANY – A collection of material relating to the evolution of broadcasting in the early 20th century. £3,000–5,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 27: Francesco Maurolico (1494–1575). <i>Martyrologium … Francisci Maurolyci … multo quam antea purgatum, & locupletatum</i>. Venice: Lucas Antonius Giunta, 1568. £6,000–9,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 39: Henry Purcell (1659–1695). <i>Orpheus Britannicus</i>. A Collection of all the Choicest Songs for One, Two, and Three Voices. London: for Henry Playford, 1698–1702. £3,000–5,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 111: Abraham Ortelius (1527–1598). <i>Theatrum oder Schwabüch des Erdtkreijs</i>. Antwerp: [Jan Baptist Vrients], 1602. £10,000–15,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 138: W. L. Wyllie and H. W. Brewer. <i>Bird's Eye View of London as seen from a balloon</i>. London: The Graphic, 1884. £3,000–5,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 202: John Speed (1552–1629). <i>The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine</i>. London, 1627–[46]. £15,000–25,000
  • <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Bill Wilson, Alcoholics Anonymous. Stunning first edition in original dust jacket.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Valentine Davies, Miracle on 34th Street. A holiday favorite.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility. Austen’s first published novel.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Seeking to purchase fine books and collections.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Jack Kerouac, On the Road. The Beat generation bible.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Print catalogues regularly issued, call or email for a copy.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman. An exceptional first edition.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace. Rare London edition, the first in English.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> William Wordsworth, Poems. In a charming full-morocco binding.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Print catalogues regularly issued, call or email for a copy.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451. In the publisher’s asbestos binding.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Cormac McCarthy, Blood Meridian. McCarthy’s best book.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Hound of the Baskervilles. A Fine copy.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Seeking to purchase fine books and collections.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Robert Bloch, Psycho. A lovely copy of a fragile book.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Roald Dahl, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. A perennial favorite.

AE Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - March - 2014 Issue

Western Americana from the William Reese Company

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Western Americana.

The William Reese Company has issued a catalogue of Western Americana, their catalogue number 309. It contains all new material for the firm, acquired in 2013. It includes a mix of books and one-of-a-kind manuscripts and photographs. The great majority of items are from the 19th century. There was not much written about the area prior to the 19th century, while later material is not quite “Old West” western Americana, hence the concentration from the 1800's to early 1900's. The works offered are historic, significant, and desirable to anyone fascinated with the American West in its youth. Here are a few samples.

 

We start with a remarkable letter written by Sam Houston in 1855. Houston was a Texas senator at the time he wrote to fellow Texas Senator Thomas J. Rusk. Houston was seeking the nomination of the Know-Nothing Party, then at the peak of its very brief run as a serious contender. While noted for its nativist, anti-immigrant and anti-Catholic positions, the party was surprisingly moderate on the slavery issue. Houston represented a slave state, and was a slaveowner himself, and yet this letter finds him on his way to Boston to speak to the Boston Anti-Slavery Society. Rusk had sent Houston a warning that speaking to this group would be harmful to his political aspirations, but from his train Houston writes, “...I must go on. Under like circumstances Gen. Jackson would have done so. To be honest and fear not is the right path. I would not conceal an honest opinion for the Presidency... I know well it is a risk, but it is for the harmony of the Union, if perchance I benefit it.” Houston did not get that chance, as the Know-Nothings selected a safer candidate, former President Millard Fillmore. However, Houston would remain loyal to the “harmony of the Union,” being removed from his office as Governor of Texas in 1861 when he refused to take an oath of loyalty to the Confederacy after opposing secession. Priced at $6,750.

 

Item 118 is a Mexican War letter which also contains some very interesting political observations. It was written by William Wallace Smith Bliss to a fellow soldier, Ethan Allen Hitchcock. It is dated July 23, 1846, from Matamoros. Bliss was evidently serving on General Zachary Taylor's staff at the time. He provides some details of the fighting and other conditions in Mexico, but what is perhaps most intriguing is Bliss' opinion of Taylor's presidential ambitions. Taylor was the ultimate reluctant candidate. He expressed no interest in the presidency, and claimed he had never even voted, but his growing popularity made him a desirable candidate for either party. He would eventually agree to run as a Whig in 1848, though he expressed little interest in their programs and did little to support them after he was elected. His popularity came from the belief that he was a man of principle, rather than politics, and by essentially taking no public stands on the issues of the day, managed to avoid seriously offending voters either North or South. In 1846, Bliss accounts that Taylor was already receiving a steady flow of letters urging him to seek the presidency. Based on his observations, Bliss is convinced Taylor will not do so. Writes Bliss, “The General is pestered with all sorts of presents and complimentary letters... But his greatest torment is the Presidential question... He replies to all these (I believe, for I am happily rid of this part of the correspondence) that he has no views to the Presidency – that he is opposed to the elevation to that office of any military chief – and that above all he does not wish his name used in any such connection while operating in the field, as it might inspire the Govt. with distrust and impair his usefulness. Depend upon it, he has no higher ambition than to retire to the bosom of his family. I cannot believe that he will suffer himself to be brought forward as a candidate under any circumstances.” Wrong! $2,850.

 

Next up is one of the more recent items in this catalogue, a photo album with the manuscript title Souvenir of a Pleasant Month. It was compiled by Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Riker of California. They had engaged on a road trip through California and Arizona. This was no longer the Old West, but the beginning of the New West, as the Rikers traveled by automobile rather than horse. Nonetheless, it would have been primitive, and perhaps not so “pleasant” by today's standards. They traveled during 1915, when roads were still mostly primitive. The Lincoln Highway had only just connected East and West a short time earlier. The album includes photographs of Los Angeles, Santa Barbara, and San Diego, including 15 of the 1915 San Diego Exposition. They head north and visit Monterey, Carmel, Santa Cruz and Palo Alto. In San Francisco, they snap photographs of the buildings of the Panama Pacific Exhibition. Another 50 photos capture a camping trip to Yosemite. They also move on to Arizona where they photograph the Grand Canyon and the Petrified Forest. Item 26. $950.

AE Monthly


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