• <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> FIRE OF LONDON. A True Pourtraict with a Brief Description Of that Deplorable Fire of London. Sold for US$ 6,875 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> MATHER, INCREASE. A Brief History of the Warr With the Indians in New-England. Sold for US$ 45,000 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> SALEM WITCH TRIALS. Manuscript Document variously signed. Sold for US$ 6,875 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> REVERE, PAUL. The Bloody Massacre perpetrated in King-Street Boston. Sold for US$ 100,000 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> LEXINGTON AND CONCORD. Bloody Butchery by the British Troops. Sold for US$ 118,750 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. The New-England Chronicle. Sold for US$ 257,000 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION. By the President of the United States. Sold for US$ 15,000 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> BASEBALL. Boston Union Athletic Exhibition Company Grounds. Sold for US$ 15,000 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> MCCLELLAND, GEORGE WILLIAM. Eniac-Birth Certificate of Computer Age. 1880-1955. Typed Letter Signed. Sold for US$ 13,750 inc. premium.
  • <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>F. Scott Fitzgerald. The Great Gatsby. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1925.First edition, first issue in a near fine jacket.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Ernest Hemingway. The Sun Also Rises. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1926. First edition, first issue.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Jack Kerouac. On the Road. New York: Viking, 1957. First edition, presentation copy.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>JRR Tolkien. The Hobbit. London: George Allen & Unwin, Ltd., 1937. First edition, fine copy in jacket.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Vladimir Nabokov. Lolita. Paris: the Olympia Press, 1955. First edition presentation copy inscribed on the half-title.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Tennessee Williams. A Streetcar Named Desire. Norfolk, CT: New Directions, 1947. Inscribed by Tennesee Williams and Director Elia Kazan with additional inscriptions or signatures by all the cast members.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>T.S. Eliot. The Waste Land. Richmond, Surrey: Printed and published by Leonard and Virignia Woolf, 1923. First English edition, nscribed to Eliot’s patroness Lady Mary Lilian Rothermere.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Ernest Hemingway. Three Stories and Ten Poems. Paris: Contact Publishing Co., 1923. A mint first edition presentation copy of Hemingway’s landmark first book.
    <b>Sotheby's New York, 1 April 2014: </b> A Modern Library: The Gordon Waldorf Collection.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>William Faulkner. Light in August. New York: Harrison Smith & Robert Haas, 1932. First edition inscribed to Myrtle Ramey.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>James Joyce. Ulysses. Paris: Shakespeare & Co, 1922. First edition, one of 150 press-numbered copies on vergé d’Arches.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>F. Scott Fitzgerald. This Side of Paradise. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1920. First edition with jacket in fine condition.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Dashiell Hammett. The Thin Man. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, MCMXXXIV. First American edition. A presentation copy inscribed.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Raymond Chandler. Farewell, My Lovely. New York: Knopf, 1940. First edition presentation copy, being a copy that Chandler originally retained, inscribed on the front endpaper.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>J.D. Salinger. The Catcher in the Rye. Boston: Little, Brown, & Co., 1951. First edition.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Anthony Burgess. A Clockwork Orange. London: Heinemann, 1962. First edition and a rare presentation copy inscribed by the author.
  • <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> DALI, BRETON, V. HUGO and GALA. <i>Surrealist portrait of Lenin</i>. 1932. Cadavre exquis signed by all four. On a postcard addressed to René Char. Estimate €15,000-20,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> CELINE. <i>Voyage au bout de la nuit</i>. One of 20 copies on vélin d’Arches, inscribed to Roland Saucier and a binding by A. Cerutti. Estimate €80,000-120,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> PROUST. <i>Autograph letter to Gaston Gallimard</i>, about the Jeunes filles en fleurs and his dreyffusian past. December 21, 1919. 4 pages. Estimate €10,000-15,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> REVERDY. <i>La Lucarne ovale. 1916</i>. First edition. One of 6 copies on Japan paper. Binding by Jean de Gonet. With a letter by Pierre Albert-Birot. Estimate €28,000-35,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> STENDHAL. <i>Histoire de la Peinture en Italie</i>. 1817. First edition, inscribed to count Kosakowsky.<br>Estimate €20,000-30,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> BAUDELAIRE. Théophile Gautier. 1859. Exceptional copy with contemporary binding, inscribed to Edouard Manet.<br>Estimate €40,000-60,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> OVIDIUS. [<i>Complete works</i>]. Venice, Aldus, 1502-1503. 17th cent. vellum. Estimate €3,000-5,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> GIEGHER. <i>Le Tre trattati</i>. Padova, 1639. Contemporary binding. Estimate €8,000-12,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> ROLEWINCK. <i>Fasciculus temporum</i>. Lyon, Huss, 1496. From the Seillières collection. Estimate €4,000-6,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> AMUS. <i>32 autograph letters to Liliane Choucroun</i>. 1936-1952.<br>Estimate €60,000-80,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> LA FONTAINE. <i>Fables</i>. 1668. Morocco by Bedford. First collective edition. Estimate €6,000-8,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> ROUAULT. <i>Cirque de l’étoile filante</i>. Ambroise Vollard, 1938. Fine binding by Creuzevault. Copy on Japon Impérial. Estimate €30,000-50,000
  • <b>19th Century Shop</b>. 30th anniversary catalogue of landmark rare books, autographs and manuscripts, and historical photographs of all ages.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. <i>The Federalist</i> (1788). An important association copy in original boards, untrimmed.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Isaac Newton. <i>Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica</i> (1687).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Important Age of Discovery manuscript (1512) with Christopher Columbus content.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Shakespeare's <i>Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies</i> (1632).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. John Rockefeller. Ambrotype, the earliest known photograph of Rockefeller.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Muybridge, <i>Animal Locomotion</i> (1887) subscriber's copy.

AE Monthly

Reviews - April - 2013 Issue

Outlaws and Lawmen from Kenston Rare Books

Kenstonwinter2013

Granville Torbett on the cover of the latest Kenston catalogue.

Kenston Rare Books has issued a catalogue of Outlaws & Lawmen. Kenston is a specialist on Texas and the American West, the Old West to be specific. This one, as the title indicates, is not so much focused on cowboys and Indians as on outlaws and those who pursued them. There is not much about the the Custers and Sitting Bulls here, but Billy the Kid, Jesse James and Wyatt Earp fill many of its pages. The personalities cover the Kid and James' era up to that of Bonnie and Clyde, half a century later. The books, however, range from contemporary to recent. You will find books for collecting, reading, or mostly, both. Let's take a look.

That picture you see on the cover of this catalogue is probably that of Granville Torbett, author of the title 78 Days in Muskogee Jail and What I Seen There. Merle Haggard may have thought Muskogee was the most wonderful place on earth, but Mr. Torbett strenuously disagreed. His 78 days were evidently most unpleasant. Torbett does not tell us exactly why he was thrown in jail, but he says the defense attorneys are but “confidence slicks and grafters of the legal profession.” The marshals are interestingly described as a “cross between humans and measles.” Conditions in the jail were deplorable, with rotten food, inadequate clothing, indifferent guards, and generally inhuman treatment. However, Torbett saves his worst attacks for the government of what was then Indian Territory, saying it was run by “carpet baggers from New Jersey.” This is a very obscure title, and while this copy is not in the best of condition, you may never come across another. Item 182. Priced at $385.

Here is Wyatt Earp as you never knew him. Earp is today remembered for his winning role during the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral in Tombstone, Arizona. He was the good guy, the U.S. marshal who gunned down the bad guys. In the days after, Earp bounced around to many locations and many jobs. One of them was as a boxing referee, which led to his receiving the job of officiating a heavyweight title bout in 1896 between champion Bob Fitzsimmons and Tom Sharkey. By the end of this fight, Earp was better known for his role as a referee than a gunfighter, and he was no longer the good guy in most people's eyes. Earp arrived at the ring with his six-shooter strapped to his waist, whereupon marshals were forced to remove it. What was controversial, however, occurred in the ring. In the eighth round, Fitzsimmons knocked Sharkey to the canvas, the latter apparently being in some state of unconciousness or semi-consciousness. The fight was over, but not in the way most expected. Earp ruled that Fitzsimmons hit Sharkey while he was down, a claim disputed by many. He awarded the victory to the unconscious Sharkey. Needless to say, this did not make Earp a popular man with the crowd. Fitzsimmons later sued for the purse, but was rebuffed when the court decided it could not rule on the case because boxing was illegal in San Francisco. Many charged Earp with fixing the fight, but no one knows for sure what was his motivation. He moved on to other pursuits, never returning to San Francisco until his ashes were buried there in 1929. Item 40 is The Earp Decision, by Jack DeMattos, published in 1984. It contains newspaper accounts of the controversial fight and the court case that followed. $30.

Billy the Kid has received much bad press over the years. It's time to look at Billy The Kid: The Good Side of a Bad Man. The Kid has been alleged to be many unpleasant things – cold blooded killer, cattle rustler, thief. Certainly he killed many men, but the circumstances and motivation are not always clear. He had many defenders, who saw Billy as a defender of the underdog against powerful interests. Unquestionably, he was extremely loyal to those he served, and was popular with many at the low end of the social spectrum, especially poor Mexican-Americans who had few supporters outside of their own community. This 1989 book, by Lee Priestley with Marquita Peterson, is based on interviews with families from New Mexico whose ancestors had known Billy and passed down their memories of him. Item 124. $30.

Billy the Kid met his demise in a darkened room, at the wrong end of a gun held by Sheriff Pat Garrett. At least that's how the story goes. As frequently happens when such celebrated people die, rumors persisted that it was not really Billy who was shot that night, that the event was staged, or it was someone else, or who knows what. The theory is that Billy went into hiding to live his days peacefully somewhere else (like Elvis). Item 191 is Billy The Kid:Killedin New MexicoDied in Texas, by Dr. Jannay P. Valdez and Judge Bobby E. Hefner, published in 1994. They support the theory that “Brushy” Bill Roberts, of Hico, Texas, who died in 1950, almost 70 years after Garrett supposedly shot The Kid, was really Billy. Roberts was extensively interviewed in the late 1940s, and said many things that could make you believe he was Billy, and others that could make you question his claim. Sixty years after he died, he still has his supporters and detractors. $45.

AE Monthly


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