• <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> FIRE OF LONDON. A True Pourtraict with a Brief Description Of that Deplorable Fire of London. Sold for US$ 6,875 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> MATHER, INCREASE. A Brief History of the Warr With the Indians in New-England. Sold for US$ 45,000 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> SALEM WITCH TRIALS. Manuscript Document variously signed. Sold for US$ 6,875 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> REVERE, PAUL. The Bloody Massacre perpetrated in King-Street Boston. Sold for US$ 100,000 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> LEXINGTON AND CONCORD. Bloody Butchery by the British Troops. Sold for US$ 118,750 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. The New-England Chronicle. Sold for US$ 257,000 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION. By the President of the United States. Sold for US$ 15,000 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> BASEBALL. Boston Union Athletic Exhibition Company Grounds. Sold for US$ 15,000 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> MCCLELLAND, GEORGE WILLIAM. Eniac-Birth Certificate of Computer Age. 1880-1955. Typed Letter Signed. Sold for US$ 13,750 inc. premium.
  • <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>F. Scott Fitzgerald. The Great Gatsby. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1925.First edition, first issue in a near fine jacket.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Ernest Hemingway. The Sun Also Rises. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1926. First edition, first issue.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Jack Kerouac. On the Road. New York: Viking, 1957. First edition, presentation copy.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>JRR Tolkien. The Hobbit. London: George Allen & Unwin, Ltd., 1937. First edition, fine copy in jacket.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Vladimir Nabokov. Lolita. Paris: the Olympia Press, 1955. First edition presentation copy inscribed on the half-title.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Tennessee Williams. A Streetcar Named Desire. Norfolk, CT: New Directions, 1947. Inscribed by Tennesee Williams and Director Elia Kazan with additional inscriptions or signatures by all the cast members.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>T.S. Eliot. The Waste Land. Richmond, Surrey: Printed and published by Leonard and Virignia Woolf, 1923. First English edition, nscribed to Eliot’s patroness Lady Mary Lilian Rothermere.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Ernest Hemingway. Three Stories and Ten Poems. Paris: Contact Publishing Co., 1923. A mint first edition presentation copy of Hemingway’s landmark first book.
    <b>Sotheby's New York, 1 April 2014: </b> A Modern Library: The Gordon Waldorf Collection.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>William Faulkner. Light in August. New York: Harrison Smith & Robert Haas, 1932. First edition inscribed to Myrtle Ramey.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>James Joyce. Ulysses. Paris: Shakespeare & Co, 1922. First edition, one of 150 press-numbered copies on vergé d’Arches.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>F. Scott Fitzgerald. This Side of Paradise. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1920. First edition with jacket in fine condition.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Dashiell Hammett. The Thin Man. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, MCMXXXIV. First American edition. A presentation copy inscribed.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Raymond Chandler. Farewell, My Lovely. New York: Knopf, 1940. First edition presentation copy, being a copy that Chandler originally retained, inscribed on the front endpaper.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>J.D. Salinger. The Catcher in the Rye. Boston: Little, Brown, & Co., 1951. First edition.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Anthony Burgess. A Clockwork Orange. London: Heinemann, 1962. First edition and a rare presentation copy inscribed by the author.
  • <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> DALI, BRETON, V. HUGO and GALA. <i>Surrealist portrait of Lenin</i>. 1932. Cadavre exquis signed by all four. On a postcard addressed to René Char. Estimate €15,000-20,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> CELINE. <i>Voyage au bout de la nuit</i>. One of 20 copies on vélin d’Arches, inscribed to Roland Saucier and a binding by A. Cerutti. Estimate €80,000-120,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> PROUST. <i>Autograph letter to Gaston Gallimard</i>, about the Jeunes filles en fleurs and his dreyffusian past. December 21, 1919. 4 pages. Estimate €10,000-15,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> REVERDY. <i>La Lucarne ovale. 1916</i>. First edition. One of 6 copies on Japan paper. Binding by Jean de Gonet. With a letter by Pierre Albert-Birot. Estimate €28,000-35,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> STENDHAL. <i>Histoire de la Peinture en Italie</i>. 1817. First edition, inscribed to count Kosakowsky.<br>Estimate €20,000-30,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> BAUDELAIRE. Théophile Gautier. 1859. Exceptional copy with contemporary binding, inscribed to Edouard Manet.<br>Estimate €40,000-60,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> OVIDIUS. [<i>Complete works</i>]. Venice, Aldus, 1502-1503. 17th cent. vellum. Estimate €3,000-5,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> GIEGHER. <i>Le Tre trattati</i>. Padova, 1639. Contemporary binding. Estimate €8,000-12,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> ROLEWINCK. <i>Fasciculus temporum</i>. Lyon, Huss, 1496. From the Seillières collection. Estimate €4,000-6,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> AMUS. <i>32 autograph letters to Liliane Choucroun</i>. 1936-1952.<br>Estimate €60,000-80,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> LA FONTAINE. <i>Fables</i>. 1668. Morocco by Bedford. First collective edition. Estimate €6,000-8,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> ROUAULT. <i>Cirque de l’étoile filante</i>. Ambroise Vollard, 1938. Fine binding by Creuzevault. Copy on Japon Impérial. Estimate €30,000-50,000
  • <b>19th Century Shop</b>. 30th anniversary catalogue of landmark rare books, autographs and manuscripts, and historical photographs of all ages.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. <i>The Federalist</i> (1788). An important association copy in original boards, untrimmed.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Isaac Newton. <i>Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica</i> (1687).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Important Age of Discovery manuscript (1512) with Christopher Columbus content.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Shakespeare's <i>Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies</i> (1632).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. John Rockefeller. Ambrotype, the earliest known photograph of Rockefeller.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Muybridge, <i>Animal Locomotion</i> (1887) subscriber's copy.

AE Monthly

Reviews - December - 2012 Issue

25 Unusual Items from Simon Beattie

Beattie05

A very large number 05.

Simon Beattie recently issued his Short List 5. Considering the catalogue is 16” in height, it doesn't much look like a short list, but inside reveals just 25 items in this oversized publication. Beattie reports that it took him a year to find these 25 items, and they are such an odd mix we are not surprised. Though located in England, much of what Beattie offers comes from Russia, Germany, and France, and sometimes from places, at least spiritually, hard to pinpoint. If you enjoy the eclectic, you will like Beattie's catalogues. These are some samples of the 25.

Here is an item you probably don't have, unless, perhaps, you lived in the old Soviet Union, and even then, probably not. It is titled (sort of) Slava nebesnym brat'iam... or, in English, “Glory to our heavenly brothers! Verse and songs of Soviet cosmonauts.” The Soviets didn't have a lot of triumphs over the West in scientific and other such endeavors, but they did manage to get out first in space. They had the first satellite, and in the year before this was published - 1962 – they put the first man in space, cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin. That was worth some poems and songs, and this one contains some memorable ones, such as Fourteen minutes to liftoff, and The blue planet. March of the Soviet Cosmonauts. The latter was first sung by the multi-talented cosmonaut Pavel Popovich, eighth man in space. Item 7. Priced at £750 (British pounds or $1,202 in U.S. currency).

Here is a piece which is hard to fathom. Is it a touching tribute or an item of tacky “humor?” It is described as a “most worthy memorial of compassion.” Seeing that the poem on the second of the two leaves was written by a local preacher, Christoph Bezzel, it was probably a tribute, though one can't help but wonder what was this man thinking. The tribute is to Anna Maria Loffelholz von Colberg, who died in June of 1727. After her death, an enormous kidney stone weighing 14 ounces was removed from her body (why didn't they remove it before she died when it might have helped her?). The first leaf reproduces a life-size engraving of the kidney stone. Beattie notes, “If the reproduction of the stone seems ghoulish, the poem appears equally tasteless to modern sensibilities.” Bezzel seems to make puns using the word for “stone” (stein) such as she came from Holenstein, lived in Steinach, and so on. Item 16. £850 (US $1,363).

Here is another touching piece with a bit of a twist. It is a manuscript “book of daily worship” dated May 1, 1832. It was created by Stanislaw Debicki for his wife while in exile in France. Debicki had participated in the November Uprising, an unsuccessful attempt by members of the Polish military against Russian rule. Many of the soldiers made their way west to France rather than face the terrible consequences awaiting them at the hands of the Russians. Debicki has supplemented his handwritten text with 9 mounted engravings taken from elsewhere. However, it appears that, while evidently devoted to his wife, Debicki was a bit of a rogue. He made his money in France by cheating other people out of theirs. He claimed at times that he was a count, a major in the U.S. Army, and a member of the Legion of Honor. He was deported in 1848. By 1863, a note on the verso of the title page indicates the book had reached English bookseller J.A. Grimes of the East End bookshop. Grimes said he picked up the book in hopes of finding someone in the family, “to whom it must, I think, be considered a treasure.” Beattie continues the search. Item 8. £1,200 (US $1,924).

Item 10 is a pair of rebuses, the first theoretically a letter from a sailor at sea to his sweetheart back home, the second her reply. “Rebus” is one of those words you may not know, but you instantly recognize one when you see it. It is where pictures are used in place of some of the letters or words. I struggle to figure out the meaning of most of these images, perhaps because the English language was not quite the same in 1799 when these were printed, though the picture of an eye for the word “I” is an obvious one still used today. These two sheets, published by Laurie & Whittle of Fleet Street, London, appear very rare, only one uncolored copy showing up on OCLC (these have been colored). The two pieces are headed A Hieroglyphic Epistle and A Hieroglyphic Answer. £2,500 (US $4,009).

Item 20 is a book you are not supposed to see, but the purchaser will have a chance anyway. It is the second, expanded edition of the “infamous” Polunbi-Katalog. “Polunbi” stood for German Central Police Bureau for Combating Obscene Pictures, Books, and Advertisements. Evidently there was a lot of that stuff in 1926 decadent Weimar Germany. This book describes thousands of confiscated pieces and whether they were removed from circulation or cleaned up. The preface notes that it is “to be regarded as a secret file and therefore to be kept under constant lock and key.” If lost, the number of the copy had to immediately be turned over to the Central Police Bureau. Beattie notes, “As one might expect, the book is extremely rare.” £1,500 (US $2,406).

AE Monthly


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