• <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> FIRE OF LONDON. A True Pourtraict with a Brief Description Of that Deplorable Fire of London. Sold for US$ 6,875 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> MATHER, INCREASE. A Brief History of the Warr With the Indians in New-England. Sold for US$ 45,000 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> SALEM WITCH TRIALS. Manuscript Document variously signed. Sold for US$ 6,875 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> REVERE, PAUL. The Bloody Massacre perpetrated in King-Street Boston. Sold for US$ 100,000 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> LEXINGTON AND CONCORD. Bloody Butchery by the British Troops. Sold for US$ 118,750 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. The New-England Chronicle. Sold for US$ 257,000 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION. By the President of the United States. Sold for US$ 15,000 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> BASEBALL. Boston Union Athletic Exhibition Company Grounds. Sold for US$ 15,000 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> MCCLELLAND, GEORGE WILLIAM. Eniac-Birth Certificate of Computer Age. 1880-1955. Typed Letter Signed. Sold for US$ 13,750 inc. premium.
  • <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>F. Scott Fitzgerald. The Great Gatsby. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1925.First edition, first issue in a near fine jacket.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Ernest Hemingway. The Sun Also Rises. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1926. First edition, first issue.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Jack Kerouac. On the Road. New York: Viking, 1957. First edition, presentation copy.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>JRR Tolkien. The Hobbit. London: George Allen & Unwin, Ltd., 1937. First edition, fine copy in jacket.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Vladimir Nabokov. Lolita. Paris: the Olympia Press, 1955. First edition presentation copy inscribed on the half-title.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Tennessee Williams. A Streetcar Named Desire. Norfolk, CT: New Directions, 1947. Inscribed by Tennesee Williams and Director Elia Kazan with additional inscriptions or signatures by all the cast members.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>T.S. Eliot. The Waste Land. Richmond, Surrey: Printed and published by Leonard and Virignia Woolf, 1923. First English edition, nscribed to Eliot’s patroness Lady Mary Lilian Rothermere.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Ernest Hemingway. Three Stories and Ten Poems. Paris: Contact Publishing Co., 1923. A mint first edition presentation copy of Hemingway’s landmark first book.
    <b>Sotheby's New York, 1 April 2014: </b> A Modern Library: The Gordon Waldorf Collection.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>William Faulkner. Light in August. New York: Harrison Smith & Robert Haas, 1932. First edition inscribed to Myrtle Ramey.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>James Joyce. Ulysses. Paris: Shakespeare & Co, 1922. First edition, one of 150 press-numbered copies on vergé d’Arches.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>F. Scott Fitzgerald. This Side of Paradise. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1920. First edition with jacket in fine condition.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Dashiell Hammett. The Thin Man. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, MCMXXXIV. First American edition. A presentation copy inscribed.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Raymond Chandler. Farewell, My Lovely. New York: Knopf, 1940. First edition presentation copy, being a copy that Chandler originally retained, inscribed on the front endpaper.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>J.D. Salinger. The Catcher in the Rye. Boston: Little, Brown, & Co., 1951. First edition.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Anthony Burgess. A Clockwork Orange. London: Heinemann, 1962. First edition and a rare presentation copy inscribed by the author.
  • <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> DALI, BRETON, V. HUGO and GALA. <i>Surrealist portrait of Lenin</i>. 1932. Cadavre exquis signed by all four. On a postcard addressed to René Char. Estimate €15,000-20,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> CELINE. <i>Voyage au bout de la nuit</i>. One of 20 copies on vélin d’Arches, inscribed to Roland Saucier and a binding by A. Cerutti. Estimate €80,000-120,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> PROUST. <i>Autograph letter to Gaston Gallimard</i>, about the Jeunes filles en fleurs and his dreyffusian past. December 21, 1919. 4 pages. Estimate €10,000-15,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> REVERDY. <i>La Lucarne ovale. 1916</i>. First edition. One of 6 copies on Japan paper. Binding by Jean de Gonet. With a letter by Pierre Albert-Birot. Estimate €28,000-35,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> STENDHAL. <i>Histoire de la Peinture en Italie</i>. 1817. First edition, inscribed to count Kosakowsky.<br>Estimate €20,000-30,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> BAUDELAIRE. Théophile Gautier. 1859. Exceptional copy with contemporary binding, inscribed to Edouard Manet.<br>Estimate €40,000-60,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> OVIDIUS. [<i>Complete works</i>]. Venice, Aldus, 1502-1503. 17th cent. vellum. Estimate €3,000-5,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> GIEGHER. <i>Le Tre trattati</i>. Padova, 1639. Contemporary binding. Estimate €8,000-12,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> ROLEWINCK. <i>Fasciculus temporum</i>. Lyon, Huss, 1496. From the Seillières collection. Estimate €4,000-6,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> AMUS. <i>32 autograph letters to Liliane Choucroun</i>. 1936-1952.<br>Estimate €60,000-80,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> LA FONTAINE. <i>Fables</i>. 1668. Morocco by Bedford. First collective edition. Estimate €6,000-8,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> ROUAULT. <i>Cirque de l’étoile filante</i>. Ambroise Vollard, 1938. Fine binding by Creuzevault. Copy on Japon Impérial. Estimate €30,000-50,000
  • <b>19th Century Shop</b>. 30th anniversary catalogue of landmark rare books, autographs and manuscripts, and historical photographs of all ages.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. <i>The Federalist</i> (1788). An important association copy in original boards, untrimmed.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Isaac Newton. <i>Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica</i> (1687).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Important Age of Discovery manuscript (1512) with Christopher Columbus content.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Shakespeare's <i>Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies</i> (1632).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. John Rockefeller. Ambrotype, the earliest known photograph of Rockefeller.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Muybridge, <i>Animal Locomotion</i> (1887) subscriber's copy.

AE Monthly

Reviews - September - 2012 Issue

Works from the Four Corners from Back of Beyond Books

Backofbeyobd8

Books from the Four Corners.

I recently returned from my summer vacation, a sojourn through the beautiful states of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah, to find a surprise in my mailbox. It was the latest catalogue from Back of Beyond Books of Moab, Utah, Rare Book Catalog #8. As the introduction explains, “This issue features titles from the states of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah.” This review is not work, it is simply an extension of my vacation. There are few places more scenic and spectacular than the Four Corners of the American Southwest, from high mountains to flaming red canyons and deserts and even a few plains. The snow-topped peaks didn't have much snow this year, a victim of either unusual heat or drought. Nevertheless, the beauty to be discovered in this region astounds. Meanwhile, the people are a hearty lot, used to living on the edge of civilization. No, it is not the isolation of years ago. Moab, once a sleepy little mining town, is a mountain biking and tourist center today. Nonetheless, this is still an area where one can get away from civilization, and experience the land free from the clutter of today's suburban world, a place where you can still imagine what the writers or subjects of many of these old books experienced in another time. Now, here are some books from this world in back of beyond.

Life was never easy in this rugged land, but item 10 takes us back to a particularly hard era: Cliff Dweller Christmas Annual 1938. This was during the Great Depression, and this booklet was published by the Civilian Conservation Corps working at Mesa Verde National Park in Colorado. The CCC provided jobs for out-of-work men from the 1930s through the early 1940s, often working on preservation projects such as this. This booklet describes the projects that were accomplished and includes anecdotes from the men working at the location. CCC camps were found throughout the Four Corners states at the time, though many of the workers came from states far to the east as well as locals. Priced at $20.

One of the earliest explorations of the Colorado River basin in Utah has largely been forgotten. In 1859, the U.S. government sent Capt. John Macomb, along with naturalist John S. Newberry, with an expedition to map out a route from Santa Fe to the convergence of the Grand and Green Rivers (the Colorado River above the confluence was known as the Grand in those days). It is suspected the underlying reason for wanting to find such a route had to do with issues the government had with Mormons in Utah at the time. Macomb didn't find a clear route, but the expedition did learn much about the geography, geology, and botany of the area, most of this data gathered by naturalist Newberry. However, they never quite made it to the junction of the two rivers, a deep canyon in the barren badlands area in today's Canyonlands National Park. The results of their expedition were almost lost, as the intervening Civil War prevented publication of their findings. It was not until 1876 that the results were finally published as Exploring Expedition from Santa Fe, New Mexico, to the Junction of the Grand and Green Rivers of the Great Colorado of the West. Item 45. $3,200.

It may have been impossible to actually get to this territory at the time, but that didn't stop people from selling lots there. Item 23 is an 1861 certificate for a share in Grand Port City containing 50 lots. Grand Port City was supposedly located south of the confluence of the Green and Grand Rivers, one of the last parts of continental America ever to be explored. No one would even pass through the area until John Wesley Powell rode down the river in 1869, seven years later. He could have then told them that the place was thoroughly unsuitable for a port, an area of rapid whitewater surrounded by enormous cliffs with little vegetation. Offered are two certificates, the lucky owners being William and Martha Slaughter. $650.

English is a difficult language to read, what with its silent letters and inconsistent sounds for many letters. Nonetheless, as Brigham Young could tell you, it is very difficult to get people to change their language. Young attempted to get his Mormon flock to adopt a new written language, based on the created Deseret alphabet. All this strange looking alphabet was was an attempt to create phonetic symbols for spoken English. Young figured it would be much easier for children to learn to read a phonetic version of English, and that this would be particularly helpful for foreign converts who might learn to speak English, but not write it. Some suspected Young might have also wanted to make it hard for others to read Mormon writings, or for Mormons to read books not produced by their leaders. Whatever the thought processes, the influential Young had little success with this project. After 15 years of preparation, the Church finally began printing books in Deseret. At some point, it must have dawned upon the church fathers that reprinting all of the world's literature in a new language would be a difficult and costly undertaking. In all, only four books were ever published in Deseret, and by 1870, the project was abandoned. Item 21 is the Deseret Reader, First and Second Volumes, published in 1868. Other than these, only the Book of Mormon and the First Book of Nephi were ever published in this odd alphabet of 38 letters. $450.

AE Monthly


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