• <b>Bonhams New York, FINE BOOKS & MANUSCRIPTS, 10 Dec 2014.</b>
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 5. FESTBUCH: Procession Following Charles V's Coronation as Holy Roman Emperor by Pope Clement<br>VII. Est. $120,000-180,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 6. GUTENBERG BIBLE. [Bible in Latin. Mainz: Johann Gutenberg and Fust, 1455.] Est. $40,000-60,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 21. CORONELLI, VICENZO MARIA.<br>1650-1718. [Atlante Veneto.]<br> Est. $25,000-30,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 33. GIGAULT DE LA SALLE, ACHILLE ÉTIENNE. 1772-1840. Voyage pittoresque en Sicile. Est. $25,000-35,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 50. ROTTERDAM. [DE HOOGHE, ROMEYN, AND JOANNES DE VOU.] Album.<br>Est. $50,000-70,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 77. JOSEPH, MICHAEL. A Book of Cats. Covici Friede, 1930. Est. $20,000-30,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 124. DICKENS, CHARLES. 1812-1870. The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club. Est. $20,000-25,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 145. SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM. 1564-1616. Shakespear's Comedies, Histories and Tragedies. Est. $40,000-60,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 160. JOYCE, JAMES. 1882-1941. Pomes Penyeach. Paris: Obelisk Press. [September] 1932. Est. $45,000-75,000.
  • <b>19th Century Shop</b>. 30th anniversary catalogue of landmark rare books, autographs and manuscripts, and historical photographs of all ages.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Abraham Lincoln, "a previously unknown portrait of exceptional quality." From the collection of John Hay.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. <i>The Federalist</i> (1788). An important association copy in original boards, untrimmed.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Isaac Newton. <i>Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica</i> (1687).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Shakespeare's <i>Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies</i> (1632).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. John Rockefeller. Ambrotype, the earliest known photograph of Rockefeller.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Muybridge, <i>Animal Locomotion</i> (1887) subscriber's copy.
  • <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 7: A collection of letters and documents of Scottish industrialist & politician<br>D. J. Macdonald, 1922–1939.<br>£3,000–5,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 9: MARCONI WIRELESS TELEGRAPH COMPANY – A collection of material relating to the evolution of broadcasting in the early 20th century. £3,000–5,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 27: Francesco Maurolico (1494–1575). <i>Martyrologium … Francisci Maurolyci … multo quam antea purgatum, & locupletatum</i>. Venice: Lucas Antonius Giunta, 1568. £6,000–9,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 39: Henry Purcell (1659–1695). <i>Orpheus Britannicus</i>. A Collection of all the Choicest Songs for One, Two, and Three Voices. London: for Henry Playford, 1698–1702. £3,000–5,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 111: Abraham Ortelius (1527–1598). <i>Theatrum oder Schwabüch des Erdtkreijs</i>. Antwerp: [Jan Baptist Vrients], 1602. £10,000–15,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 138: W. L. Wyllie and H. W. Brewer. <i>Bird's Eye View of London as seen from a balloon</i>. London: The Graphic, 1884. £3,000–5,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 202: John Speed (1552–1629). <i>The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine</i>. London, 1627–[46]. £15,000–25,000
  • <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Bill Wilson, Alcoholics Anonymous. Stunning first edition in original dust jacket.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Valentine Davies, Miracle on 34th Street. A holiday favorite.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility. Austen’s first published novel.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Seeking to purchase fine books and collections.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Jack Kerouac, On the Road. The Beat generation bible.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Print catalogues regularly issued, call or email for a copy.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman. An exceptional first edition.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace. Rare London edition, the first in English.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> William Wordsworth, Poems. In a charming full-morocco binding.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Print catalogues regularly issued, call or email for a copy.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451. In the publisher’s asbestos binding.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Cormac McCarthy, Blood Meridian. McCarthy’s best book.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Hound of the Baskervilles. A Fine copy.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Seeking to purchase fine books and collections.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Robert Bloch, Psycho. A lovely copy of a fragile book.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Roald Dahl, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. A perennial favorite.

AE Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - August - 2012 Issue

75 Fine Books from Peter Harrington

Harrington84

75 fine books.

Peter Harrington has issued their 84th catalogue, Seventy-Five Fine Books. These are every bit as fine as the title says. This is a collection of important books, in top condition, in first or other important editions. There are not many you won't recognize. They range from early printings of antiquarian works to science, travel, literature and other fields. Many types of books are represented, with importance being the common thread. Here are a few.

In 1663, Robert Hooke placed some tiny specimens under his new, compound microscope. He was amazed by what he saw. Within a few years, so would the rest of the world. He began to see things invisible to the naked eye. He began placing everything under the microscope, and drawing what he saw. His drawing of a flea, the size of a bird, is probably the most famous, not to mention horrible sight he drew. The flea is not a handsome creature. He also gave us mosquitoes and fungi, but what was most important is that he gave us our first look at cells. He was the first to describe these basic units of tissue as being a “cell.” Item 12 is a first edition, first issue copy of Micrographia: or some Physiological Descriptions of Minute Bodies Made by Magnifying Glasses, published in 1655. It contains 38 plates of what Hooke saw. Priced at £65,000 (British pounds, roughly $101,780 U.S. dollars).

Item 42 is a very special copy of a work that is performed as a play every Christmas all over the world. That, naturally, is Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol. There is no need to recount the plot line as everyone knows it. This copy is unique as it contains Dickens' inscription to “George Cattermole from his friend Charles Dickens, Eighth November 1845.” Cattermole was an artist and illustrator who illustrated a couple of Dickens' books. However, he was more than that. He was a close personal friend of the great writer. Dickens possessed a couple of his friend's paintings, and when Cattermole died, Dickens worked “tirelessly” to raise money to support his widow and children. This is a copy of the 1844 edition. £50,000 (US $78,230).

There is probably no greater book in western literature, certainly in English literature, than this one. Item 10 is a copy of Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies. This was only the second appearance of his works, what is generally referred to as the Second Folio, published in 1632. After the playwright's death in 1616, it was likely that all of his great works would soon disappear. His plays had been performed, but they were not published. Fortunately, a group of his friends, realizing something needed to be done to preserve them, published this collection in 1623, in the edition known as the First Folio. Two more folio editions would be published in the 17th century, and then with the 18th century, countless editions of his various works would roll off of presses. The first edition is extremely difficult to find now, and all four folios are highly collectible. £385,000 (US $602,500).

Item 5 is the great work of the 16th century scientist William Gilbert. If you are wondering who gave electricity its name, it was Gilbert. That comes from the Greek word for amber, from which Gilbert created static electricity. Gilbert was particularly focused on magnetism, and concluded that the earth itself was a large magnet, that being the explanation for the working of a compass. He also was a strong supporter of the Copernican theory of the universe, long before Galileo's support of the same got him in serious trouble with ecclesiastical authorities. The title of Gilbert's book, published in 1600, is De Magnete, Magneticisque Corporibus, et de Magno Magnete Tellure. £30,000 (US $46,975).

AE Monthly


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