• <b>Bonhams 4 June 2014:</b> China: The Camera Collection. An extensive collection of material from archives of John David Zumbrun and Camera Craft. Sold for US$ 317,000 inc. premium
    <b>Bonhams 4 June 2014:</b> Chernikhov, Yakov Geogievich. 1889-1951. <i>Architectural Cycles</i>. Sold for US$ 425,000 inc. premium
    <b>Bonhams 4 June 2014:</b> Turing, Alan Mathison. 1912-1954. On Computable Numbers, Application to the Entscheidungsproblem. Sold for US$ 50,000 inc. premium
    <b>Bonhams 4 June 2014:</b> CHERNIKHOV, YAKOV GEORGIEVICH. 1889-1951. Sold for US$ 173,000 inc. premium
    <b>Bonhams 4 June 2014:</b> GÖDEL, KURT. On Undecidable Propositions of Formal Mathematical Systems. Sold for US$ 47,500 inc. premium
    <b>Bonhams 4 June 2014:</b> FEYNMAN, RICHARD and LARRY GROBEL. Original Cassette Tape of an interview of Nobel prize winning physicist. Sold for US$ 37,500 inc. premium
    <b>Bonhams 5 June 2014:</b> A D-Day 48 star Ensign flown from LST-493, 6th June 1944. Sold for US$ 386,500 inc. premium
    <b>Bonhams 5 June 2014:</b> A Rare Enigma three rotor Enciphering Machine Germany circa 1942-44. Sold for US$ 92,500 inc. premium
    <b>Bonhams 5 June 2014:</b> Anonymous, alithographic poster, 1939. Sold for US$ 27,500 inc. premium
  • <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 10. Bowdich (T. Edward). Mission from Cape Coast Castle to Ashantee. Est. £700-£1,000.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 14. Burton (Richard F). Two Trips to Gorilla Land, and the Cataracts of the Congo. Est. £500-£800.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 19. Cook (James & King, James). A Voyage to the Pacific Ocean...<br>Est. £6,000-£8,000.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 74. Loutherbourg (P.J. de). The Romantic and Picturesque Scenery of England and Wales From Drawings. Est. £800-£1,200.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 90. Curtis (William). The Botanical Magazine or Flower-Garden Displayed, 10 vols. Est. £800-£1,200
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 112. British Isles. Ortelius (Abraham), Angliae, Scotiae et Hiberniae, sive Britannicar Insularum Descriptio [1573]. Est. £400-£600.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 141. India. Mercator (Gerard & Hondius Henricus), India Orientalis, c.1613. Est. £500-£800.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 232. Shepard (Ernest Howard, 1879-1976). Danse Micawber.<br>Est. £250-£350.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 250. Dukes of Cambridge. An Account of the Succession of the Earls.<br>Est. £1,500-£2,000.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 262. Missing Persons Reward Broadside. £100 Reward. Youth missing from his Home.<br>Est. £100-£150.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 273. [Royal Banquet Broadside]. Dedicated to the Right Hon. the Lady Mayoress. Est. £200-£300.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 289. Chinese Rubbings. A series of original rubbings of Luohan or Buddhist holy men. Qing dynasty.<br>Est. £700-£1,000.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 309. The Holy Bible, Containing the Old Testament, and the New.<br>Est. £500-£800.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 311. French Royal Armorial Binding. Etrennes aux Amateurs de la Vie. Est. £1,200-£1,500.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 335. Hobbes (Thomas). Elements of Philosophy, the First Section, Body. Est. £3,000-£5,000.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 371. [Bulwer, John]. Chirologia: Or the Naturall Language of the Hand. Est. £300-£500.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 457. Eliot (T.S.). The Waste Land, first appearnace, in The Criterion.<br>Est. £1,500-£2,000.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 478. [Rowling, J. K.]. The Silkworm [by] Robert Galbraith, 1st edition, Sphere, 2014, Signed.<br>Est. £200-£300.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 482. Wilde (Oscar). A Woman of No Importance, John Lane, 1894.<br>Est. £1,200-£1,800.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 500. Denham (H.M.). Sailing Directions from Point Lynas to Liverpool. Est. £200-£300.
  • <b>19th Century Shop</b>. 30th anniversary catalogue of landmark rare books, autographs and manuscripts, and historical photographs of all ages.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Abraham Lincoln, "a previously unknown portrait of exceptional quality." From the collection of John Hay.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. <i>The Federalist</i> (1788). An important association copy in original boards, untrimmed.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Isaac Newton. <i>Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica</i> (1687).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Shakespeare's <i>Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies</i> (1632).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. John Rockefeller. Ambrotype, the earliest known photograph of Rockefeller.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Muybridge, <i>Animal Locomotion</i> (1887) subscriber's copy.
  • <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> DALI, BRETON, V. HUGO and GALA. <i>Surrealist portrait of Lenin</i>. 1932. Cadavre exquis signed by all four. On a postcard addressed to René Char. Estimate €15,000-20,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> CELINE. <i>Voyage au bout de la nuit</i>. One of 20 copies on vélin d’Arches, inscribed to Roland Saucier and a binding by A. Cerutti. Estimate €80,000-120,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> PROUST. <i>Autograph letter to Gaston Gallimard</i>, about the Jeunes filles en fleurs and his dreyffusian past. December 21, 1919. 4 pages. Estimate €10,000-15,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> REVERDY. <i>La Lucarne ovale. 1916</i>. First edition. One of 6 copies on Japan paper. Binding by Jean de Gonet. With a letter by Pierre Albert-Birot. Estimate €28,000-35,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> STENDHAL. <i>Histoire de la Peinture en Italie</i>. 1817. First edition, inscribed to count Kosakowsky.<br>Estimate €20,000-30,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> BAUDELAIRE. Théophile Gautier. 1859. Exceptional copy with contemporary binding, inscribed to Edouard Manet.<br>Estimate €40,000-60,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> OVIDIUS. [<i>Complete works</i>]. Venice, Aldus, 1502-1503. 17th cent. vellum. Estimate €3,000-5,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> GIEGHER. <i>Le Tre trattati</i>. Padova, 1639. Contemporary binding. Estimate €8,000-12,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> ROLEWINCK. <i>Fasciculus temporum</i>. Lyon, Huss, 1496. From the Seillières collection. Estimate €4,000-6,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> AMUS. <i>32 autograph letters to Liliane Choucroun</i>. 1936-1952.<br>Estimate €60,000-80,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> LA FONTAINE. <i>Fables</i>. 1668. Morocco by Bedford. First collective edition. Estimate €6,000-8,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> ROUAULT. <i>Cirque de l’étoile filante</i>. Ambroise Vollard, 1938. Fine binding by Creuzevault. Copy on Japon Impérial. Estimate €30,000-50,000

AE Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - August - 2012 Issue

Five Centuries of Maps from Jonathan Potter Antique Maps

Pottersum12

Summer catalogue from Jonathan Potter.

Jonathan Potter Antique Maps has released their Catalogue Summer 2012. No surprise as to what will be found here – maps. Lots of them. They range from the 15th century to the middle of the 20th. Most are quite old, dating to times when knowledge of geography was still imperfect. One can see the world evolve, at least in the eyes of its beholders, as new discoveries added to mankind's understanding of the world they inhabited. From the 15th century, when to Europeans the known world was a much smaller place, to the discovery of new lands in the East and West, to the refining of the coastlines of these new discoveries, and lastly to understanding the internal regions of these new lands, the evolution of man's understanding of their world can be traced through these maps. Here are some of those steps along the way as seen on the pages of Jonathan Potter's latest catalogue.

We will start with the world as it was known for 1,500 years, perhaps longer, at least to those in the West. There was little difference in the world as it was known in antiquity and at the dawn of the Age of Discovery. In 1493, Hartmann Schedel published his history of the world, known commonly as the Nuremberg Chronicle. Item 1 is the world map from this great work. The world to Europeans had not changed since Greek and Roman times, consisting of Europe, southern Asia, and northern Africa. Schedel's map shows this small world being supported by the three sons of Noah, while various heads blow winds from different directions. Along the side are various strange-looking creatures thought, or perhaps surmised, to live in the far corners of the earth. What Schedel would not have understood as he prepared his work was that a man named Columbus was discovering vast new land masses that would forever change the size and understanding of what was out there. Schedel's map was, in effect, the last look at the ancient Ptolemaic world, soon to be changed forever. Priced at £14,000 (British pounds, or roughly $21,686 U.S. dollars).

Item 4 is a 16th century printing of one of the most important maps ever published, it being one of the first to display the New World. Martin Waldseemuller first published his map of the New World in 1507, calling it “America.” However, when he reprinted it in 1513, he changed it to “Terra Nova,” perhaps recognizing that Columbus, not Amerigo Vespucci, discovered it. By then it was too late. The name “America” had stuck to the land. Laurent Fries republished a smaller size version of Waldseemuller's 1513 atlas four times between 1522 and 1541. Item 4 is taken from the 1541 printing. Fries made some minor changes updating current knowledge, and added a vignette showing some South American cannibals and an opossum. The last two editions of Fries' atlas were published by Michael Servetus, a Spanish cartographer, but also a scientist, humanist, and theologian. That last role got him in much trouble, and reduced the copies of his books available as many were burned. Servetus did not believe in infant baptism, nor did he believe in the orthodox view of the Trinity, arguing that the Trinity represented three aspects of one God, rather than three distinct beings. Such differences could get you in serious trouble in those days, and not even reformist Protestants had much mercy on nonconforming thoughts. Servetus was burned at the stake for his heresies, with John Calvin being a leader in pushing for his execution (Calvin did call for the more merciful beheading, but others overruled his request and burned him alive). £12,800 (US $19,806).

AE Monthly


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