• <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> FIRE OF LONDON. A True Pourtraict with a Brief Description Of that Deplorable Fire of London.<br>US$ 6,000 - 8,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> MATHER, INCREASE. A Brief History of the Warr With the Indians in New-England. US$ 25,000 - 35,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> SALEM WITCH TRIALS. Manuscript Document variously signed. US$ 8,000 - 12,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> REVERE, PAUL. The Bloody Massacre perpetrated in King-Street Boston. US$ 25,000 - 35,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> DRURY, JOTHAM. PLANNING THE BOSTON TEA PARTY. Autograph Document Signed. US$ 25,000 - 35,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> LEXINGTON AND CONCORD. Bloody Butchery by the British Troops. US$ 25,000 - 35,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. The New-England Chronicle. US$ 50,000 - 70,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> CORINTH, MISSISSIPPI IN 1862. Albumen print photograph. US$ 1,000 - 1,500.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION. By the President of the United States. US$ 15,000 - 20,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> [EDISON, THOMAS ALVA. 1847-1931.] Engraved $1 Bill, Endorsed and Signed by Charles L. Clarke on face. US$ 8,000 - 12,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> BASEBALL. Boston Union Athletic Exhibition Company Grounds. US$ 15,000 - 25,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> CASSIDY, BUTCH. Carte-de-visite police photograph.<br>US$ 20,000 - 30,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> [BUFFALO BILL.] <i>The Great Train Hold-Up & Bandit Hunters of the Union Pacific</i>. US$ 3,000 - 5,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> MCCLELLAND, GEORGE WILLIAM. Eniac-Birth Certificate of Computer Age. 1880-1955. Typed Letter Signed. US$ 6,000 - 8,000.
  • <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>F. Scott Fitzgerald. The Great Gatsby. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1925.First edition, first issue in a near fine jacket.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Ernest Hemingway. The Sun Also Rises. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1926. First edition, first issue.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Jack Kerouac. On the Road. New York: Viking, 1957. First edition, presentation copy.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>JRR Tolkien. The Hobbit. London: George Allen & Unwin, Ltd., 1937. First edition, fine copy in jacket.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Vladimir Nabokov. Lolita. Paris: the Olympia Press, 1955. First edition presentation copy inscribed on the half-title.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Tennessee Williams. A Streetcar Named Desire. Norfolk, CT: New Directions, 1947. Inscribed by Tennesee Williams and Director Elia Kazan with additional inscriptions or signatures by all the cast members.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>T.S. Eliot. The Waste Land. Richmond, Surrey: Printed and published by Leonard and Virignia Woolf, 1923. First English edition, nscribed to Eliot’s patroness Lady Mary Lilian Rothermere.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Ernest Hemingway. Three Stories and Ten Poems. Paris: Contact Publishing Co., 1923. A mint first edition presentation copy of Hemingway’s landmark first book.
    <b>Sotheby's New York, 1 April 2014: </b> A Modern Library: The Gordon Waldorf Collection.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>William Faulkner. Light in August. New York: Harrison Smith & Robert Haas, 1932. First edition inscribed to Myrtle Ramey.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>James Joyce. Ulysses. Paris: Shakespeare & Co, 1922. First edition, one of 150 press-numbered copies on vergé d’Arches.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>F. Scott Fitzgerald. This Side of Paradise. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1920. First edition with jacket in fine condition.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Dashiell Hammett. The Thin Man. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, MCMXXXIV. First American edition. A presentation copy inscribed.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Raymond Chandler. Farewell, My Lovely. New York: Knopf, 1940. First edition presentation copy, being a copy that Chandler originally retained, inscribed on the front endpaper.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>J.D. Salinger. The Catcher in the Rye. Boston: Little, Brown, & Co., 1951. First edition.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Anthony Burgess. A Clockwork Orange. London: Heinemann, 1962. First edition and a rare presentation copy inscribed by the author.
  • <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> DALI, BRETON, V. HUGO and GALA. <i>Surrealist portrait of Lenin</i>. 1932. Cadavre exquis signed by all four. On a postcard addressed to René Char. Estimate €15,000-20,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> CELINE. <i>Voyage au bout de la nuit</i>. One of 20 copies on vélin d’Arches, inscribed to Roland Saucier and a binding by A. Cerutti. Estimate €80,000-120,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> PROUST. <i>Autograph letter to Gaston Gallimard</i>, about the Jeunes filles en fleurs and his dreyffusian past. December 21, 1919. 4 pages. Estimate €10,000-15,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> REVERDY. <i>La Lucarne ovale. 1916</i>. First edition. One of 6 copies on Japan paper. Binding by Jean de Gonet. With a letter by Pierre Albert-Birot. Estimate €28,000-35,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> STENDHAL. <i>Histoire de la Peinture en Italie</i>. 1817. First edition, inscribed to count Kosakowsky.<br>Estimate €20,000-30,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> BAUDELAIRE. Théophile Gautier. 1859. Exceptional copy with contemporary binding, inscribed to Edouard Manet.<br>Estimate €40,000-60,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> OVIDIUS. [<i>Complete works</i>]. Venice, Aldus, 1502-1503. 17th cent. vellum. Estimate €3,000-5,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> GIEGHER. <i>Le Tre trattati</i>. Padova, 1639. Contemporary binding. Estimate €8,000-12,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> ROLEWINCK. <i>Fasciculus temporum</i>. Lyon, Huss, 1496. From the Seillières collection. Estimate €4,000-6,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> AMUS. <i>32 autograph letters to Liliane Choucroun</i>. 1936-1952.<br>Estimate €60,000-80,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> LA FONTAINE. <i>Fables</i>. 1668. Morocco by Bedford. First collective edition. Estimate €6,000-8,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> ROUAULT. <i>Cirque de l’étoile filante</i>. Ambroise Vollard, 1938. Fine binding by Creuzevault. Copy on Japon Impérial. Estimate €30,000-50,000
  • <b>19th Century Shop</b>. 30th anniversary catalogue of landmark rare books, autographs and manuscripts, and historical photographs of all ages.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. <i>The Federalist</i> (1788). An important association copy in original boards, untrimmed.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Isaac Newton. <i>Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica</i> (1687).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Important Age of Discovery manuscript (1512) with Christopher Columbus content.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Shakespeare's <i>Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies</i> (1632).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. John Rockefeller. Ambrotype, the earliest known photograph of Rockefeller.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Muybridge, <i>Animal Locomotion</i> (1887) subscriber's copy.

AE Monthly

Reviews - July - 2012 Issue

American Signed Documents from Joe Rubinfine

Rubinfine170

Letter from Charles Carroll on cover of Joe Rubinfine's latest catalogue.

Joe Rubinfine recently published his List 170. Rubinfine specializes in American historical autographs. Much of the material is entirely in hand, generally personal letters. Other items are partially filled-in forms, including stock certificates or photographs. These too contain personal signatures. Some are as familiar as John Hancock, Abe Lincoln and George Washington, others less familiar names who nonetheless played some notable role in American history. Like real estate, they won't be making any more of these autographs. None of these personalities is with us any more, their last signatures written years ago. Fortunately, Joe Rubinfine has gathered up a bunch made long ago, and they are available to collectors in the pages of this catalogue.

Item 29 comes from the man whose autograph is more famous than that of any other – John Hancock. In the days after the American colonies declared their independence, Hancock was serving as President of the Continental Congress. The revolution was off to less than a sterling beginning, and the Congress wished to see more support from the states. On October 2, 1776, Hancock sent around a letter to the states, noting that Congress was “at present deeply engaged in Matters of the utmost Importance to the Welfare of America,” and therefore it was “absolutely necessary that there should be a full representation of the several states as soon as possible.” Hancock goes on to cajole them to send sufficient representatives so that “the Sentiments of America be the better known upon the interesting Subjects that lie before them. I shall therefore only once more request your compliance with this Requisition of Congress...” It is not known to which state's officials this copy was sent. Some of these letters had an opening paragraph requesting physicians be appointed to the military, others, such as this one, did not. The reason is not clear. The letter concludes with Hancock's unmistakable signature. Priced at $22,500.

The most hated post-Revolution practice of the British, in American eyes, was the impressment of American seamen. The British would force seamen from American merchant ships, on the claim that they were British subjects, into the Royal Navy, on the spot. After a couple of decades, it finally was a major factor leading to war. Item 41 is a letter from Secretary of State (soon to be Supreme Court Chief Justice) John Marshall from January 1801. It includes proof that a couple of impressed Americans were American citizens. The British would relent and free a few American seamen on proof of citizenship from the government. The two nations would go to war in 1812, and while the British did not officially agree to stop the practice as part of the peace treaty in 1814, they discontinued the practice. $7,000.

Charles Carroll of Carrollton was the last of a most illustrious group of Americans. When Thomas Jefferson and John Adams both died on July 4, 1826, exactly 50 years after the Declaration of Independence was approved, Carroll became the last surviving signer of the Declaration. Carroll, a delegate from Maryland, was also the only Catholic signer. Item 9 is a letter signed by Carroll as the last living signer, it being dated July 16, 1826. In it, he accepts an invitation to ceremonies in Baltimore honoring the recently passed Jefferson and Adams, “to commemorate the veneration & respect so justly due to the memories of the illustrious Signers of the declaration of our Independence who bore so conspicuous a part in that great event.” Carroll lived until 1832, when he died at age 95. $20,000.

Item 45 is another letter from a last survivor. Rembrandt Peale was one of America's most noted early artists. He painted from the late 18th century to the mid-19th, a prolific artist noted primarily for his portraits. He painted many of America's leading figures, including the most notable of all, George Washington. His father, Charles Willson Peale, was also an artist and had painted Washington in 1787. His father introduced young Rembrandt to the American general at the time, leading to Rembrandt's opportunity to paint Washington too, in 1795 when he was just 17 years old. He would paint many more portraits of Washington over the years, using his own painting and those of others as models after his subject died. This letter was written by Peale in 1857 to an autograph seeker. By then Peale was the last man living who had painted Washington in person, and Peale acknowledges his position “as the Oldest Artist in America & the last surviving Painter of Washington...” Peale was 79 at the time, and lived to be 82. $1,000.

AE Monthly


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