• <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> FIRE OF LONDON. A True Pourtraict with a Brief Description Of that Deplorable Fire of London.<br>US$ 6,000 - 8,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> MATHER, INCREASE. A Brief History of the Warr With the Indians in New-England. US$ 25,000 - 35,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> SALEM WITCH TRIALS. Manuscript Document variously signed. US$ 8,000 - 12,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> REVERE, PAUL. The Bloody Massacre perpetrated in King-Street Boston. US$ 25,000 - 35,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> DRURY, JOTHAM. PLANNING THE BOSTON TEA PARTY. Autograph Document Signed. US$ 25,000 - 35,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> LEXINGTON AND CONCORD. Bloody Butchery by the British Troops. US$ 25,000 - 35,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. The New-England Chronicle. US$ 50,000 - 70,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> CORINTH, MISSISSIPPI IN 1862. Albumen print photograph. US$ 1,000 - 1,500.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION. By the President of the United States. US$ 15,000 - 20,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> [EDISON, THOMAS ALVA. 1847-1931.] Engraved $1 Bill, Endorsed and Signed by Charles L. Clarke on face. US$ 8,000 - 12,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> BASEBALL. Boston Union Athletic Exhibition Company Grounds. US$ 15,000 - 25,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> CASSIDY, BUTCH. Carte-de-visite police photograph.<br>US$ 20,000 - 30,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> [BUFFALO BILL.] <i>The Great Train Hold-Up & Bandit Hunters of the Union Pacific</i>. US$ 3,000 - 5,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> MCCLELLAND, GEORGE WILLIAM. Eniac-Birth Certificate of Computer Age. 1880-1955. Typed Letter Signed. US$ 6,000 - 8,000.
  • <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>F. Scott Fitzgerald. The Great Gatsby. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1925.First edition, first issue in a near fine jacket.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Ernest Hemingway. The Sun Also Rises. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1926. First edition, first issue.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Jack Kerouac. On the Road. New York: Viking, 1957. First edition, presentation copy.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>JRR Tolkien. The Hobbit. London: George Allen & Unwin, Ltd., 1937. First edition, fine copy in jacket.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Vladimir Nabokov. Lolita. Paris: the Olympia Press, 1955. First edition presentation copy inscribed on the half-title.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Tennessee Williams. A Streetcar Named Desire. Norfolk, CT: New Directions, 1947. Inscribed by Tennesee Williams and Director Elia Kazan with additional inscriptions or signatures by all the cast members.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>T.S. Eliot. The Waste Land. Richmond, Surrey: Printed and published by Leonard and Virignia Woolf, 1923. First English edition, nscribed to Eliot’s patroness Lady Mary Lilian Rothermere.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Ernest Hemingway. Three Stories and Ten Poems. Paris: Contact Publishing Co., 1923. A mint first edition presentation copy of Hemingway’s landmark first book.
    <b>Sotheby's New York, 1 April 2014: </b> A Modern Library: The Gordon Waldorf Collection.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>William Faulkner. Light in August. New York: Harrison Smith & Robert Haas, 1932. First edition inscribed to Myrtle Ramey.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>James Joyce. Ulysses. Paris: Shakespeare & Co, 1922. First edition, one of 150 press-numbered copies on vergé d’Arches.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>F. Scott Fitzgerald. This Side of Paradise. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1920. First edition with jacket in fine condition.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Dashiell Hammett. The Thin Man. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, MCMXXXIV. First American edition. A presentation copy inscribed.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Raymond Chandler. Farewell, My Lovely. New York: Knopf, 1940. First edition presentation copy, being a copy that Chandler originally retained, inscribed on the front endpaper.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>J.D. Salinger. The Catcher in the Rye. Boston: Little, Brown, & Co., 1951. First edition.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Anthony Burgess. A Clockwork Orange. London: Heinemann, 1962. First edition and a rare presentation copy inscribed by the author.
  • <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> MONTESQUIEU Refflexions sur le caractere de quelques Princes. [1734]. 68 autograph pages.<br>Estimate €150,000-200,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> LOUIS XVI Autograph letter to Gabrielle de Polignac. (VERSAILLES) 12 SEPTEMBRE 1789. Estimate €10,000-15,000.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> LOUIS XVI Autograph letter to Gabrielle de Polignac. PARIS, 9 FÉVRIER 1790.<br>Estimate €15,000-20,000.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> SCHEDEL, Hartmann. Liber chronicarum. July 1493. Richly annotated by a French humanist.<br>Estimate €20,000-30,000.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris: Livres et Manuscrits, 26 NOVEMBER 2013.</b>
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> GAUGUIN, Paul. The first known letter to his wife Mette. 1883. Estimate €20,000-30,000.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> MAURRAS, Charles. Letter to general Franco. 30 août 1935. And 5 first editions inscribed to Anatole France, Ramon Fernandez...<br>Estimate €8,000-12,000.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> PROUST. Placard for A l’ombre des jeunes filles en fleurs, with a long autograph passage, remained unpublished.<br>Estimate €30,000-40,000.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris: Livres et Manuscrits, 26 NOVEMBER 2013.</b>
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> [PROUST] – André GIDE. The draft for the famous letter from Gide to Proust repenting about his refusal to publish him. 10 or 11 January 1914. Estimate €100,000-150,000.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> DELAUNAY, Sonia. 3 drawings for La Prose du Transsibérien’s prospectus. 1913. Estimate €20,000-30,000.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> CELINE. Voyage au bout de la nuit. 1932. André Breton’s copy with an inscription by Céline. Estimate €10,000-15,000.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> LINDBERGH, Charles. Photographic portrait, inscribed to Antoine de Saint-Exupéry. 1939. €2,500-3,500.
  • <b>19th Century Shop</b>. 30th anniversary catalogue of landmark rare books, autographs and manuscripts, and historical photographs of all ages.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. <i>The Federalist</i> (1788). An important association copy in original boards, untrimmed.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Isaac Newton. <i>Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica</i> (1687).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Important Age of Discovery manuscript (1512) with Christopher Columbus content.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Alexander Gardner photograph portrait (1863), signed by Abraham Lincoln.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. John Rockefeller. Ambrotype, the earliest known photograph of Rockefeller.

AE Monthly

Reviews - June - 2012 Issue

Travel and Exploration from Bestebreurtje Rare Books

Bestebreurtje146

Travel and Exploration.

Gert Jan Bestebreurtje Rare Books has issued their latest selection, Catalogue 146. Travel & Exploration. It is filled with works of historical significance as well as more obscure titles. The travels were early, ranging from the 16th through the 19th century. They mostly started in Europe, but reached all corners of the globe, or at least its various rounded edges. What they discovered fills the pages of these books. Here, now, are a few of them.

We will start with one of the earliest, the Cosmographia of Petrus Apianus. First published in 1524, this is a 1545 Antwerp edition, augmented by the work of mathematician Gemma Frisius. The work is filled with information on geography, astronomy, navigation and more. It would be printed throughout the 16th century, eventually being available in 14 languages. What it is best remembered for, however, is its world map. Once believed to be the first map to use the name “America” to describe the New World, it may still be the second after Waldseemuller. Item 3. Priced at €13,500 (euros, or about $17,468).

Moving ahead a couple of centuries, we have a classic African adventure: Travels to Discover the Source of the Nile... by James Bruce. Bruce traveled to Africa in 1768 in attempt to find the headwaters of a river known for millennia in the West, but whose source was always a mystery. He attacked the expected source through Ethiopia, reaching what he thought was his goal in 1770. Alas, what Bruce had discovered was the source of the Blue Nile, considered the major tributary, but not the main branch, that being the White Nile. Item 14 is a first edition, published in 1790. Item 14. €4,250 (US $5,491).

Item 6 is a play, and a moral lesson, from long ago: Oronooko: a Tragedy. This is a second edition (1699) of Thomas Southerne's play, first published in 1696. It is the story of an African prince (Oronooko), captured into slavery and sent to Suriname. Without getting deeply into the details, he falls in love with the daughter of a general, they are separated, she is sold into slavery, they get back together, he leads a slave revolt, Oronooko is forced to kill her to spare the woman from what would be done to her, and then he is killed. This story actually predates Southerne's play. It was originally written by Aphra Behn and published in 1688, the year before she died. She claims to have visited Suriname, and most scholars believe she did, though the point is in dispute. Southerne effusively gives Behn credit in his forward. However, the story became better known in Southerne's version, and the playwright's tale displays the horrors of slavery more boldly than did Behn's. The result was that it became a favorite of abolitionists in the late 18th century. €2,250 (US $2,908).

James Edward Alexander compiled a long career in the British military and as an explorer. He wrote numerous books about his travels, including this one which took him to America: Transatlantic Sketches, Comprising Visits to the Most Interesting Scenes in North and South America, and the West Indies. With Notes on Negro Slavery and Canadian Emigration. He visited the wilds of South America, numerous islands of the Caribbean, and on to North America, where he traveled up the Mississippi, Ohio and St. Lawrence Rivers, and then turned down the Hudson to New York and major east coast cities. The journey consisted of 16,000 miles worth of adventures. Unlike many Englishmen of the day (1830s), Alexander defends the practice of slavery. While stating that it cannot be defended in the abstract, he says that since past governments encouraged it, and West Indian slavery is necessary for British plantations in the West Indies, it would be ruinous to have immediate emancipation. Besides which, he adds, immediate emancipation would be terrible for the slaves themselves, “as must be evident to every one who knows what negroes are.” He believes they would turn to idleness and crime and the like, unlike their more worthy British overseers. Item 2. Published in 1833. €975 (US $1,261).

AE Monthly


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