• <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> FIRE OF LONDON. A True Pourtraict with a Brief Description Of that Deplorable Fire of London. Sold for US$ 6,875 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> MATHER, INCREASE. A Brief History of the Warr With the Indians in New-England. Sold for US$ 45,000 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> SALEM WITCH TRIALS. Manuscript Document variously signed. Sold for US$ 6,875 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> REVERE, PAUL. The Bloody Massacre perpetrated in King-Street Boston. Sold for US$ 100,000 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> LEXINGTON AND CONCORD. Bloody Butchery by the British Troops. Sold for US$ 118,750 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. The New-England Chronicle. Sold for US$ 257,000 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION. By the President of the United States. Sold for US$ 15,000 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> BASEBALL. Boston Union Athletic Exhibition Company Grounds. Sold for US$ 15,000 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> MCCLELLAND, GEORGE WILLIAM. Eniac-Birth Certificate of Computer Age. 1880-1955. Typed Letter Signed. Sold for US$ 13,750 inc. premium.
  • <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>F. Scott Fitzgerald. The Great Gatsby. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1925.First edition, first issue in a near fine jacket.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Ernest Hemingway. The Sun Also Rises. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1926. First edition, first issue.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Jack Kerouac. On the Road. New York: Viking, 1957. First edition, presentation copy.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>JRR Tolkien. The Hobbit. London: George Allen & Unwin, Ltd., 1937. First edition, fine copy in jacket.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Vladimir Nabokov. Lolita. Paris: the Olympia Press, 1955. First edition presentation copy inscribed on the half-title.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Tennessee Williams. A Streetcar Named Desire. Norfolk, CT: New Directions, 1947. Inscribed by Tennesee Williams and Director Elia Kazan with additional inscriptions or signatures by all the cast members.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>T.S. Eliot. The Waste Land. Richmond, Surrey: Printed and published by Leonard and Virignia Woolf, 1923. First English edition, nscribed to Eliot’s patroness Lady Mary Lilian Rothermere.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Ernest Hemingway. Three Stories and Ten Poems. Paris: Contact Publishing Co., 1923. A mint first edition presentation copy of Hemingway’s landmark first book.
    <b>Sotheby's New York, 1 April 2014: </b> A Modern Library: The Gordon Waldorf Collection.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>William Faulkner. Light in August. New York: Harrison Smith & Robert Haas, 1932. First edition inscribed to Myrtle Ramey.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>James Joyce. Ulysses. Paris: Shakespeare & Co, 1922. First edition, one of 150 press-numbered copies on vergé d’Arches.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>F. Scott Fitzgerald. This Side of Paradise. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1920. First edition with jacket in fine condition.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Dashiell Hammett. The Thin Man. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, MCMXXXIV. First American edition. A presentation copy inscribed.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Raymond Chandler. Farewell, My Lovely. New York: Knopf, 1940. First edition presentation copy, being a copy that Chandler originally retained, inscribed on the front endpaper.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>J.D. Salinger. The Catcher in the Rye. Boston: Little, Brown, & Co., 1951. First edition.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Anthony Burgess. A Clockwork Orange. London: Heinemann, 1962. First edition and a rare presentation copy inscribed by the author.
  • <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> DALI, BRETON, V. HUGO and GALA. <i>Surrealist portrait of Lenin</i>. 1932. Cadavre exquis signed by all four. On a postcard addressed to René Char. Estimate €15,000-20,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> CELINE. <i>Voyage au bout de la nuit</i>. One of 20 copies on vélin d’Arches, inscribed to Roland Saucier and a binding by A. Cerutti. Estimate €80,000-120,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> PROUST. <i>Autograph letter to Gaston Gallimard</i>, about the Jeunes filles en fleurs and his dreyffusian past. December 21, 1919. 4 pages. Estimate €10,000-15,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> REVERDY. <i>La Lucarne ovale. 1916</i>. First edition. One of 6 copies on Japan paper. Binding by Jean de Gonet. With a letter by Pierre Albert-Birot. Estimate €28,000-35,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> STENDHAL. <i>Histoire de la Peinture en Italie</i>. 1817. First edition, inscribed to count Kosakowsky.<br>Estimate €20,000-30,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> BAUDELAIRE. Théophile Gautier. 1859. Exceptional copy with contemporary binding, inscribed to Edouard Manet.<br>Estimate €40,000-60,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> OVIDIUS. [<i>Complete works</i>]. Venice, Aldus, 1502-1503. 17th cent. vellum. Estimate €3,000-5,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> GIEGHER. <i>Le Tre trattati</i>. Padova, 1639. Contemporary binding. Estimate €8,000-12,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> ROLEWINCK. <i>Fasciculus temporum</i>. Lyon, Huss, 1496. From the Seillières collection. Estimate €4,000-6,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> AMUS. <i>32 autograph letters to Liliane Choucroun</i>. 1936-1952.<br>Estimate €60,000-80,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> LA FONTAINE. <i>Fables</i>. 1668. Morocco by Bedford. First collective edition. Estimate €6,000-8,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> ROUAULT. <i>Cirque de l’étoile filante</i>. Ambroise Vollard, 1938. Fine binding by Creuzevault. Copy on Japon Impérial. Estimate €30,000-50,000
  • <b>19th Century Shop</b>. 30th anniversary catalogue of landmark rare books, autographs and manuscripts, and historical photographs of all ages.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. <i>The Federalist</i> (1788). An important association copy in original boards, untrimmed.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Isaac Newton. <i>Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica</i> (1687).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Important Age of Discovery manuscript (1512) with Christopher Columbus content.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Shakespeare's <i>Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies</i> (1632).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. John Rockefeller. Ambrotype, the earliest known photograph of Rockefeller.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Muybridge, <i>Animal Locomotion</i> (1887) subscriber's copy.

AE Monthly

Reviews - May - 2012 Issue

World's Fairs from Mark Selvaggio Books & Ephemera

Selvaggio138

World's Fairs & Expositions.

Mark Selvaggio, Books & Ephemera, is offering a catalogue of shorter form material relating to a very specific type of event – World's Fairs & Expositions. These are mainly printed pieces you would have picked up at one of these exhibitions, some free, others for a price, though some are related material, like planning for an upcoming fair. Many of these fairs were in America, but many were in Europe too. They start from one that really predates the “World's Fair” era, the 1806 Paris Exhibition, and conclude with the 1964 New York World's Fair. Some occurred during good times, but others brought respite from a stressful world, notably those of the 1930s, where first depression, and then war, made for tense and difficult times. These are a few of these mementos from the exciting events of yesteryear.

Item 25 is Centennial Portfolio: A Souvenir of the International Exposition at Philadelphia. This piece contain 52 plates depicting the various buildings at the Philadelphia Exposition of 1876. This fair was a milestone for America. It celebrated the 100th anniversary of the nation's Declaration of Independence, and was the first major fair to take place in America. Priced at $175.

Chicago's Columbian Exposition would be America's next major world's fair. The 1893 fair was meant to celebrate the 500th anniversary of Columbus' discovery of America. It was noted for introducing the electric light to the country. Item 53 is a post-fair report by the California World's Fair Commission. It recounts the various exhibits from California, both state and county. Included is a plate of the Orange Tower. Built to promote California oranges, it stood 35 feet tall and contained 14,000 oranges. The oranges had to be replaced every 3 to 4 weeks to stay fresh. $85.

Item 56 is a 1994 search for a lady who made her debut at the 1893 Chicago fair: Looking for Little Egypt. The “Egypt” name has been used by countless belly dancers since, but first was the nickname of a performer supposedly from Egypt on the fair's Midway. She performed the “danse du ventre” (dance of the belly), better known at the time as the “Hoochie-Coochie.” This book by Donna Carlton undertook the surprisingly difficult task of tracking down just who this original Little Egypt was. $30.

This was not as important an exhibition, but a historic one nonetheless: Free Guide to the Exposition, Buffalo and Vicinity 1901. It was printed by a Dr. R.V. Pierce for the Pan American Exposition 1901. Pierce was evidently a Buffalo physician who was promoting his medical wonders. The brochure included space for one to write their “Pan-American Notes,” and the owner of this copy wrote in, “saw spot where McKinley killed.” President McKinley attended this fair and it was the biggest mistake he ever made. An anarchist, with obviously differing political views, shot the President after he gave a speech to a large crowd. Item 111. $125.

From the 1931 Paris International Colonial Exposition comes item 291: Societe des Etudes Indochinoises. Indochine Francaise. La Cochinchine. In 1931, Vietnam was part of the French colonial empire. This piece deals with the region known as Cochinchina, what would later be known as South Vietnam. At the time, no one could have imagined what a burden this land would become for France in the 1950s, and much more so for America in the 1960s and 1970s. This book provides all sorts of details about the country, its history, culture, people, etc., and comes with a map of all of its automobile and rail roads. $300.

Item 326 answers the question, How does the World's Largest Thermometer Work? The Indian Refining Company erected an enormous thermometer at Chicago's A Century of Progress Fair in 1933, celebrating the city's 100th anniversary. Indian Refining erected its enormous thermometer to remind fair goers that its Havoline motor oil “is the best motor oil AT ALL TEMPERATURES.” This was an appropriate product for the Chicago fair, which was filled with exhibits by automobile manufacturers (and for a new item – air conditioning). Havoline is still available today, though the brand became associated with Texaco after they bought out Indian in the 1930s, and currently Chevron, which took over Texaco a decade ago. Incidentally, an internet search reveals that today the world's tallest thermometer is located in Baker, California, and stands 134 feet tall. The Indian/Havoline thermometer was 218 feet tall. $15.

Here is an exhibit from Chicago that must have been of limited popularity: Diet, Dentistry, Dentifrice. Souvenir of the ThreeDOral Education. Getting people there must have been like pulling teeth. It was produced by Iodent Chemical Co., a manufacturer of products such as toothpaste and toothbrushes. It delivers its message with talking ingredients who say such things as “I am Mr. Petroleum Jelly.” Item 329. $35.

AE Monthly


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