• <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> FIRE OF LONDON. A True Pourtraict with a Brief Description Of that Deplorable Fire of London. Sold for US$ 6,875 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> MATHER, INCREASE. A Brief History of the Warr With the Indians in New-England. Sold for US$ 45,000 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> SALEM WITCH TRIALS. Manuscript Document variously signed. Sold for US$ 6,875 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> REVERE, PAUL. The Bloody Massacre perpetrated in King-Street Boston. Sold for US$ 100,000 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> LEXINGTON AND CONCORD. Bloody Butchery by the British Troops. Sold for US$ 118,750 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. The New-England Chronicle. Sold for US$ 257,000 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION. By the President of the United States. Sold for US$ 15,000 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> BASEBALL. Boston Union Athletic Exhibition Company Grounds. Sold for US$ 15,000 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> MCCLELLAND, GEORGE WILLIAM. Eniac-Birth Certificate of Computer Age. 1880-1955. Typed Letter Signed. Sold for US$ 13,750 inc. premium.
  • <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>F. Scott Fitzgerald. The Great Gatsby. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1925.First edition, first issue in a near fine jacket.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Ernest Hemingway. The Sun Also Rises. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1926. First edition, first issue.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Jack Kerouac. On the Road. New York: Viking, 1957. First edition, presentation copy.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>JRR Tolkien. The Hobbit. London: George Allen & Unwin, Ltd., 1937. First edition, fine copy in jacket.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Vladimir Nabokov. Lolita. Paris: the Olympia Press, 1955. First edition presentation copy inscribed on the half-title.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Tennessee Williams. A Streetcar Named Desire. Norfolk, CT: New Directions, 1947. Inscribed by Tennesee Williams and Director Elia Kazan with additional inscriptions or signatures by all the cast members.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>T.S. Eliot. The Waste Land. Richmond, Surrey: Printed and published by Leonard and Virignia Woolf, 1923. First English edition, nscribed to Eliot’s patroness Lady Mary Lilian Rothermere.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Ernest Hemingway. Three Stories and Ten Poems. Paris: Contact Publishing Co., 1923. A mint first edition presentation copy of Hemingway’s landmark first book.
    <b>Sotheby's New York, 1 April 2014: </b> A Modern Library: The Gordon Waldorf Collection.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>William Faulkner. Light in August. New York: Harrison Smith & Robert Haas, 1932. First edition inscribed to Myrtle Ramey.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>James Joyce. Ulysses. Paris: Shakespeare & Co, 1922. First edition, one of 150 press-numbered copies on vergé d’Arches.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>F. Scott Fitzgerald. This Side of Paradise. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1920. First edition with jacket in fine condition.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Dashiell Hammett. The Thin Man. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, MCMXXXIV. First American edition. A presentation copy inscribed.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Raymond Chandler. Farewell, My Lovely. New York: Knopf, 1940. First edition presentation copy, being a copy that Chandler originally retained, inscribed on the front endpaper.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>J.D. Salinger. The Catcher in the Rye. Boston: Little, Brown, & Co., 1951. First edition.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Anthony Burgess. A Clockwork Orange. London: Heinemann, 1962. First edition and a rare presentation copy inscribed by the author.
  • <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> DALI, BRETON, V. HUGO and GALA. <i>Surrealist portrait of Lenin</i>. 1932. Cadavre exquis signed by all four. On a postcard addressed to René Char. Estimate €15,000-20,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> CELINE. <i>Voyage au bout de la nuit</i>. One of 20 copies on vélin d’Arches, inscribed to Roland Saucier and a binding by A. Cerutti. Estimate €80,000-120,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> PROUST. <i>Autograph letter to Gaston Gallimard</i>, about the Jeunes filles en fleurs and his dreyffusian past. December 21, 1919. 4 pages. Estimate €10,000-15,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> REVERDY. <i>La Lucarne ovale. 1916</i>. First edition. One of 6 copies on Japan paper. Binding by Jean de Gonet. With a letter by Pierre Albert-Birot. Estimate €28,000-35,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> STENDHAL. <i>Histoire de la Peinture en Italie</i>. 1817. First edition, inscribed to count Kosakowsky.<br>Estimate €20,000-30,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> BAUDELAIRE. Théophile Gautier. 1859. Exceptional copy with contemporary binding, inscribed to Edouard Manet.<br>Estimate €40,000-60,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> OVIDIUS. [<i>Complete works</i>]. Venice, Aldus, 1502-1503. 17th cent. vellum. Estimate €3,000-5,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> GIEGHER. <i>Le Tre trattati</i>. Padova, 1639. Contemporary binding. Estimate €8,000-12,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> ROLEWINCK. <i>Fasciculus temporum</i>. Lyon, Huss, 1496. From the Seillières collection. Estimate €4,000-6,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> AMUS. <i>32 autograph letters to Liliane Choucroun</i>. 1936-1952.<br>Estimate €60,000-80,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> LA FONTAINE. <i>Fables</i>. 1668. Morocco by Bedford. First collective edition. Estimate €6,000-8,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> ROUAULT. <i>Cirque de l’étoile filante</i>. Ambroise Vollard, 1938. Fine binding by Creuzevault. Copy on Japon Impérial. Estimate €30,000-50,000
  • <b>19th Century Shop</b>. 30th anniversary catalogue of landmark rare books, autographs and manuscripts, and historical photographs of all ages.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. <i>The Federalist</i> (1788). An important association copy in original boards, untrimmed.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Isaac Newton. <i>Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica</i> (1687).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Important Age of Discovery manuscript (1512) with Christopher Columbus content.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Shakespeare's <i>Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies</i> (1632).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. John Rockefeller. Ambrotype, the earliest known photograph of Rockefeller.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Muybridge, <i>Animal Locomotion</i> (1887) subscriber's copy.

AE Monthly

Reviews - February - 2012 Issue

Books with Important Provenance from the William Reese Company

Reesebull24

Provenance from the William Reese Company.

The William Reese Company has released their Bulletin 24: Provenance. Provenance refers to a book's history, not the book in general, but the specific copy. Primarily, it traces who has owned the book since it began its journey off the press. For most books, provenance is unknown, and probably wouldn't make much difference if it was. For a few books, however, particularly important ones, it can be traced. If the provenance is significant, the previous owners important, it can make a book more valuable, particularly if that owner's signature, or at least a bookplate, can be found. Occasionally, the one-time owner may have a particular connection to the book, in which case the provenance can add even further to its value.

Reese notes that there are two categories of provenance to be found in this collection. One is that of persons who lived contemporaneously with the publication of the book, perhaps presented the copy or were the recipients of a presentation. The other relates to the collectors who owned it, not people connected to its publication, but great collectors who once possessed the book. Reese specializes in Americana, the field of many of these books, and herein you find the past ownership of major names, presidents and other great American leaders, and notable collectors such as Streeter, Brinley, Siebert, and Estelle Doheny. Here, then, are a few of these books, including their provenance.

Item 7 is a copy of The History and Practice of Aerostation, a 1785 book by Tiberius Cavallo, and its provenance includes two notable names. This is an account of early aeronautical studies, including the earliest balloon flights. It is no surprise that this book would have been of great interest to Benjamin Franklin, the great scientist, American diplomat, printer, and anything else he chose to be. He served as American ambassador to France during the American Revolution and early days of independence, and while there made the acquaintance of Pierre Samuel DuPont. DuPont held several posts under Louis XVI, and participated in the negotiations for the Treaty of Paris, whereby England officially recognized America's independence. Though serving under the King, DuPont was an economic liberal, writer of the book Physiocracy, which attributed national wealth to agricultural labor. It was at this time that Franklin inscribed this book to Dupont, “To Mr. DuPont de Nemours from his obliged and obedt. Servt. B. Franklin.” Much of the material in this book covers the first balloon flights by the Montgolfier Brothers in France that Franklin witnessed. A few years later, DuPont would go on to be an initial supporter of the French Revolution, but like so many others, he would get caught up in its excesses and be condemned to the guillotine. Fortunately, Robespierre would meet his fate before DuPont met his, the latter being spared. However, when his family was caught up in later rioting, they moved to the United States. DuPont became friendly with Thomas Jefferson, and served as an informal diplomat during the era of Napoleon and a supporter of the Louisiana Purchase. In 1799, he inscribed and gave this book to a cousin in Carolina as a souvenir of “BonHomme Richard.” While Pierre Samuel may not be that well known today, his last name, DuPont, is quite familiar. It was his son who founded the DuPont chemical company, one of America's largest companies today. Priced at $55,000.

Item 1 ties two of America's early presidents together with one book. The title is The Duplicate Letters, the Fisheries and the Mississippi, Documents Relating to Transactions at the Negotiation in Ghent. It was a gift from future President John Quincy Adams to past President Thomas Jefferson. Jefferson and Adams' father, John Adams, had been major rivals while each served as president, but by the time this book was produced, in 1822, they had long since buried the hatchet. The younger Adams had served as a diplomat under Jefferson's successor, James Madison, and had been called back from his post in Russia to negotiate the Treaty of Ghent, the subject of this book. That was the treaty which ended the War of 1812, the last physical dispute between England and her former colonies. After receiving this gift, Jefferson wrote back to Adams expressing both his thanks and praise for the book. $65,000.

Item 32 is a Discourse, Delivered at Plymouth, December 22, 1820, in Commemoration of the First Settlement of New England, and like the previous item, it too connects first and second generation American leaders. The speaker was Daniel Webster, recently elected a Congressman from Massachusetts, though already a former Congressman from New Hampshire and well-regarded lawyer. Webster would go on to be one of the giants of the senate, one of the great if not the greatest orator of his era. This speech honored the pilgrims, but even more those who participated in the American Revolution. One of those singled out for praise was John Adams. The 85-year-old Adams would read the speech and write Webster an emotional letter of praise and thanks. This copy of the speech was inscribed by Webster to Ward Boylston, a cousin of John Adams. $62,500.

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