• <b>Bonhams New York, FINE BOOKS & MANUSCRIPTS, 10 Dec 2014.</b>
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 5. FESTBUCH: Procession Following Charles V's Coronation as Holy Roman Emperor by Pope Clement<br>VII. Est. $120,000-180,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 6. GUTENBERG BIBLE. [Bible in Latin. Mainz: Johann Gutenberg and Fust, 1455.] Est. $40,000-60,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 21. CORONELLI, VICENZO MARIA.<br>1650-1718. [Atlante Veneto.]<br> Est. $25,000-30,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 33. GIGAULT DE LA SALLE, ACHILLE ÉTIENNE. 1772-1840. Voyage pittoresque en Sicile. Est. $25,000-35,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 50. ROTTERDAM. [DE HOOGHE, ROMEYN, AND JOANNES DE VOU.] Album.<br>Est. $50,000-70,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 77. JOSEPH, MICHAEL. A Book of Cats. Covici Friede, 1930. Est. $20,000-30,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 124. DICKENS, CHARLES. 1812-1870. The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club. Est. $20,000-25,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 145. SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM. 1564-1616. Shakespear's Comedies, Histories and Tragedies. Est. $40,000-60,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 160. JOYCE, JAMES. 1882-1941. Pomes Penyeach. Paris: Obelisk Press. [September] 1932. Est. $45,000-75,000.
  • <b>19th Century Shop</b>. 30th anniversary catalogue of landmark rare books, autographs and manuscripts, and historical photographs of all ages.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Abraham Lincoln, "a previously unknown portrait of exceptional quality." From the collection of John Hay.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. <i>The Federalist</i> (1788). An important association copy in original boards, untrimmed.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Isaac Newton. <i>Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica</i> (1687).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Shakespeare's <i>Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies</i> (1632).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. John Rockefeller. Ambrotype, the earliest known photograph of Rockefeller.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Muybridge, <i>Animal Locomotion</i> (1887) subscriber's copy.
  • <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 7: A collection of letters and documents of Scottish industrialist & politician<br>D. J. Macdonald, 1922–1939.<br>£3,000–5,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 9: MARCONI WIRELESS TELEGRAPH COMPANY – A collection of material relating to the evolution of broadcasting in the early 20th century. £3,000–5,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 27: Francesco Maurolico (1494–1575). <i>Martyrologium … Francisci Maurolyci … multo quam antea purgatum, & locupletatum</i>. Venice: Lucas Antonius Giunta, 1568. £6,000–9,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 39: Henry Purcell (1659–1695). <i>Orpheus Britannicus</i>. A Collection of all the Choicest Songs for One, Two, and Three Voices. London: for Henry Playford, 1698–1702. £3,000–5,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 111: Abraham Ortelius (1527–1598). <i>Theatrum oder Schwabüch des Erdtkreijs</i>. Antwerp: [Jan Baptist Vrients], 1602. £10,000–15,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 138: W. L. Wyllie and H. W. Brewer. <i>Bird's Eye View of London as seen from a balloon</i>. London: The Graphic, 1884. £3,000–5,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 202: John Speed (1552–1629). <i>The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine</i>. London, 1627–[46]. £15,000–25,000
  • <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Bill Wilson, Alcoholics Anonymous. Stunning first edition in original dust jacket.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Valentine Davies, Miracle on 34th Street. A holiday favorite.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility. Austen’s first published novel.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Seeking to purchase fine books and collections.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Jack Kerouac, On the Road. The Beat generation bible.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Print catalogues regularly issued, call or email for a copy.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman. An exceptional first edition.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace. Rare London edition, the first in English.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> William Wordsworth, Poems. In a charming full-morocco binding.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Print catalogues regularly issued, call or email for a copy.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451. In the publisher’s asbestos binding.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Cormac McCarthy, Blood Meridian. McCarthy’s best book.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Hound of the Baskervilles. A Fine copy.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Seeking to purchase fine books and collections.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Robert Bloch, Psycho. A lovely copy of a fragile book.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Roald Dahl, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. A perennial favorite.

AE Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - February - 2012 Issue

An “ABC” from ReadInk

Readink3

A-B-C from ReadInk.

ReadInk of Los Angeles has issued Another Book Catalog (aka Number 3). As the cover image will quickly reveal, that title contains the initials ABC. This is an ABC, or alphabet book, though not one designed for the young folk. Among the letters, we find “B” is for “booze,” “D” for “deranged,” “H” for “homicide,” “V” for “vanity.” This is a collection of works often unusual, uncommon, deservedly or undeservedly forgotten, a cross-section of American writing from the early to middle of the 20th century. As in any era, a few works emerge as classics, and similarly you will find some that are well regarded today, though it may be the items that were popular in their time, but not ours, that are the most interesting. Indeed, if your great-grandchildren someday want to learn about the doings of the Kardashians, the American Idols, or why we were so concerned about gay marriage, some future ReadInk catalogue will probably be the source for their answer. This is who we were... and are.

We will start with one from the “B is for booze” category. The title of this 1935 gem edited by Sterling North and Carl Kroch is So Red the Nose; or Breath in the Afternoon. You might think from that title this is a temperance tome, but that is hardly the case. Instead, it is a cocktail recipe book, with the recipes purportedly supplied by many of the great writers of the day. These gentlemen needed no designated writers to turn out their masterpieces. Of course, you would expect Ernest Hemingway to be included, and you would not be disappointed. Others might not have been as evident, but there are contributions from Edgar Rice Burroughs, Erskine Caldwell, Alexander Woollcott, Rockwell Kent, and Theodore Dreiser. Some are tongue-in-cheek, or at least we hope so, since Dreiser's “American Tragedy Cocktail” includes gunpowder, nitroglycerine, gasoline and a lighted match. Don't try this at home, kids. Priced at $400.

From “C is for cowboy” we have the autobiography of the first major movie cowboy, William S. Hart. Hart was no singing cowboy, since he mostly starred in silent films, but he spent many of his early years roping and whatever else cowboys do in the Dakotas. Nonetheless, the title of Hart's 1929 book is My Life East and West. That's because Hart was born in Newburgh, north of New York City, hardly a western address. Actually, George Washington spent the early days of the Revolution there too, but it was a much tougher town in Hart's time than Washington's, when all he had to worry about were Redcoats. Newburgh, New York, is the Wild East. Hart would move on to Hollywood, where he parlayed his experiences into film stardom. He has inscribed this copy to his frequent co-star Jane Novak, with the comment “Scrub damn you scrub.” Presumably, this is a line from a film or some other in-joke. $600.

Next we go from a Hollywood cowboy to a Hollywood call boy. From “Q is for queer” we find the obsession with homosexuality was even greater in the last century than it is today. Much more so. Even attempts to be sympathetic in those days had to treat it as some kind of horrible derangement, to be pitied if not condemned. This 1967 paperback is entitled I am a Hollywood Call Boy, by Mark Shelby. “What sex AM I?” asks the protagonist. “I sell my body to the highest bidder – man, woman, faggot, lesbian, switch-hitter – or what have you! I commute from Sodom to Gomorrah. The sadists, the masochists, the voyeurs, the fetishists, the multi-perverts – I know them all – and they know me...and you can say that again!” I won't, because of space limitations, but you get the drift. This is not great literature (and you can say that again!), but it reflects its era as well if not better than the more notable works of the 60s. $50.

“I is for Incorporation,” and if corporations are people, this one is a very bad person. From 1949 we find E.E. Rice's book about that most infamous of “corporations,” Murder, Inc. Described as “The hair-raising story in pictures of America's bloodiest crime ring,” this book is filled with photos of notable criminals, on the streets, at trial, being arrested, occasionally dead or dying. You will get to meet all those legendary personalities whose names are associated with criminal enterprises of the day – Al Capone, Legs Diamond, Dutch Schultz, Frank Costello, and Lucky Luciano. If you want to invite these characters into your home, it is best to do so through pictures. $65.

AE Monthly


Review Search

Archived Reviews

Ask Questions