• <b>Bonhams 4 June 2014:</b> China: The Camera Collection. An extensive collection of material from archives of John David Zumbrun and Camera Craft. Sold for US$ 317,000 inc. premium
    <b>Bonhams 4 June 2014:</b> Chernikhov, Yakov Geogievich. 1889-1951. <i>Architectural Cycles</i>. Sold for US$ 425,000 inc. premium
    <b>Bonhams 4 June 2014:</b> Turing, Alan Mathison. 1912-1954. On Computable Numbers, Application to the Entscheidungsproblem. Sold for US$ 50,000 inc. premium
    <b>Bonhams 4 June 2014:</b> CHERNIKHOV, YAKOV GEORGIEVICH. 1889-1951. Sold for US$ 173,000 inc. premium
    <b>Bonhams 4 June 2014:</b> GÖDEL, KURT. On Undecidable Propositions of Formal Mathematical Systems. Sold for US$ 47,500 inc. premium
    <b>Bonhams 4 June 2014:</b> FEYNMAN, RICHARD and LARRY GROBEL. Original Cassette Tape of an interview of Nobel prize winning physicist. Sold for US$ 37,500 inc. premium
    <b>Bonhams 5 June 2014:</b> A D-Day 48 star Ensign flown from LST-493, 6th June 1944. Sold for US$ 386,500 inc. premium
    <b>Bonhams 5 June 2014:</b> A Rare Enigma three rotor Enciphering Machine Germany circa 1942-44. Sold for US$ 92,500 inc. premium
    <b>Bonhams 5 June 2014:</b> Anonymous, alithographic poster, 1939. Sold for US$ 27,500 inc. premium
  • <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 10. Bowdich (T. Edward). Mission from Cape Coast Castle to Ashantee. Est. £700-£1,000.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 14. Burton (Richard F). Two Trips to Gorilla Land, and the Cataracts of the Congo. Est. £500-£800.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 19. Cook (James & King, James). A Voyage to the Pacific Ocean...<br>Est. £6,000-£8,000.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 74. Loutherbourg (P.J. de). The Romantic and Picturesque Scenery of England and Wales From Drawings. Est. £800-£1,200.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 90. Curtis (William). The Botanical Magazine or Flower-Garden Displayed, 10 vols. Est. £800-£1,200
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 112. British Isles. Ortelius (Abraham), Angliae, Scotiae et Hiberniae, sive Britannicar Insularum Descriptio [1573]. Est. £400-£600.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 141. India. Mercator (Gerard & Hondius Henricus), India Orientalis, c.1613. Est. £500-£800.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 232. Shepard (Ernest Howard, 1879-1976). Danse Micawber.<br>Est. £250-£350.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 250. Dukes of Cambridge. An Account of the Succession of the Earls.<br>Est. £1,500-£2,000.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 262. Missing Persons Reward Broadside. £100 Reward. Youth missing from his Home.<br>Est. £100-£150.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 273. [Royal Banquet Broadside]. Dedicated to the Right Hon. the Lady Mayoress. Est. £200-£300.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 289. Chinese Rubbings. A series of original rubbings of Luohan or Buddhist holy men. Qing dynasty.<br>Est. £700-£1,000.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 309. The Holy Bible, Containing the Old Testament, and the New.<br>Est. £500-£800.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 311. French Royal Armorial Binding. Etrennes aux Amateurs de la Vie. Est. £1,200-£1,500.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 335. Hobbes (Thomas). Elements of Philosophy, the First Section, Body. Est. £3,000-£5,000.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 371. [Bulwer, John]. Chirologia: Or the Naturall Language of the Hand. Est. £300-£500.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 457. Eliot (T.S.). The Waste Land, first appearnace, in The Criterion.<br>Est. £1,500-£2,000.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 478. [Rowling, J. K.]. The Silkworm [by] Robert Galbraith, 1st edition, Sphere, 2014, Signed.<br>Est. £200-£300.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 482. Wilde (Oscar). A Woman of No Importance, John Lane, 1894.<br>Est. £1,200-£1,800.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctions July 23rd:</b> Lot 500. Denham (H.M.). Sailing Directions from Point Lynas to Liverpool. Est. £200-£300.
  • <b>19th Century Shop</b>. 30th anniversary catalogue of landmark rare books, autographs and manuscripts, and historical photographs of all ages.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Abraham Lincoln, "a previously unknown portrait of exceptional quality." From the collection of John Hay.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. <i>The Federalist</i> (1788). An important association copy in original boards, untrimmed.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Isaac Newton. <i>Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica</i> (1687).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Shakespeare's <i>Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies</i> (1632).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. John Rockefeller. Ambrotype, the earliest known photograph of Rockefeller.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Muybridge, <i>Animal Locomotion</i> (1887) subscriber's copy.
  • <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> DALI, BRETON, V. HUGO and GALA. <i>Surrealist portrait of Lenin</i>. 1932. Cadavre exquis signed by all four. On a postcard addressed to René Char. Estimate €15,000-20,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> CELINE. <i>Voyage au bout de la nuit</i>. One of 20 copies on vélin d’Arches, inscribed to Roland Saucier and a binding by A. Cerutti. Estimate €80,000-120,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> PROUST. <i>Autograph letter to Gaston Gallimard</i>, about the Jeunes filles en fleurs and his dreyffusian past. December 21, 1919. 4 pages. Estimate €10,000-15,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> REVERDY. <i>La Lucarne ovale. 1916</i>. First edition. One of 6 copies on Japan paper. Binding by Jean de Gonet. With a letter by Pierre Albert-Birot. Estimate €28,000-35,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> STENDHAL. <i>Histoire de la Peinture en Italie</i>. 1817. First edition, inscribed to count Kosakowsky.<br>Estimate €20,000-30,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> BAUDELAIRE. Théophile Gautier. 1859. Exceptional copy with contemporary binding, inscribed to Edouard Manet.<br>Estimate €40,000-60,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> OVIDIUS. [<i>Complete works</i>]. Venice, Aldus, 1502-1503. 17th cent. vellum. Estimate €3,000-5,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> GIEGHER. <i>Le Tre trattati</i>. Padova, 1639. Contemporary binding. Estimate €8,000-12,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> ROLEWINCK. <i>Fasciculus temporum</i>. Lyon, Huss, 1496. From the Seillières collection. Estimate €4,000-6,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> AMUS. <i>32 autograph letters to Liliane Choucroun</i>. 1936-1952.<br>Estimate €60,000-80,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> LA FONTAINE. <i>Fables</i>. 1668. Morocco by Bedford. First collective edition. Estimate €6,000-8,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> ROUAULT. <i>Cirque de l’étoile filante</i>. Ambroise Vollard, 1938. Fine binding by Creuzevault. Copy on Japon Impérial. Estimate €30,000-50,000

AE Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - January - 2012 Issue

Texas and the West from Kenston Rare Books

Kenstonw2011

“Pappy” O'Daniel's song on the cover of Kenston's catalogue.

Kenston Rare Books has issued a catalogue which is not named “Beautiful Texas,” despite the appearance of the front cover. It is actually just Winter 2011. “Beautiful Texas” is one of the items within, though it comes close to being a good title. The preponderance of material relates to the Lone Star State, but there are also items for collectors of other areas within the American West. As large as Texas is, this catalogue covers even more territory. Here are some of the items offered from Texas and the West.

We will start with that item on the cover. It is a Texas song, written by one W. Lee O'Daniel, better known in Texas as “Pappy” O'Daniel, musician, radio personality, Governor, and Senator from Texas. O'Daniel was not a native Texan, but came to the state where he got a job handling radio advertising for Burrus Mills, a flour company. He hired some musicians, which he dubbed “The Light Crust Doughboys,” and began appearing on his own radio show. The Doughboys were pioneers in “western swing,” and started the careers of several Texas musicians. It launched Bob Wills, who, as Texans know, is still the king. O'Daniel became enormously popular through his radio show, where he took on the nickname “Pappy,” from an ad that included the line, “Pass the biscuits, Pappy.” It was enough to launch a political career, and in 1938, O'Daniel was elected Governor. He then went on to be elected a  senator, in an extremely close election, defeating Lyndon Johnson. It was the only election Johnson ever lost. O'Daniel ran as a populist, but he became virulently anti-labor, anti-Roosevelt though a Democrat, and started seeing Communists everywhere. He did not seek reelection in 1948, his poll numbers dwindling, and failed to make a run-off for governor twice in the 1950s, when he railed against the Supreme Court's school desegregation ruling as part of a Communist plot. “Pappy” O'Daniel is better remembered for his musical contributions than his strange, ineffective political career. Item 235 is sheet music for his song, Beautiful Texas. Priced at $115.

As long as we're looking at colorful Texas governors, here's another. James “Pa” Ferguson was elected in 1914 and reelected in 1916. Ferguson found himself in a battle with the University of Texas, and was charged with embezzlement of state funds and various other offenses. He was brought before the state legislature for impeachment. The charges are contained in item 49, Proceedings of Investigation...Charges Filed Against Gov. Jas. E. Ferguson, published in 1917. He was convicted by the legislature of the charges, and his punishment included removal from office and a prohibition against ever running again. He ran again anyway, but lost in the Democratic primary (winning the Democratic primary in Texas at the time was tantamount to election, kind of like winning the Republican primary is today). Nevertheless, Ferguson would extract his revenge, and hence the nickname “Pa.” In 1924, he ran his wife, Miriam “Ma” Ferguson, for Governor and she won. “Ma” ran on a two-for-the-price-of-one platform, promising to follow her husband's footsteps. She was noted for giving a whole lot of pardons, opposing the Ku Klux Klan, and for charges of corruption (including claims she and her husband took bribes for pardons). An attempt was made to impeach her too, but unlike “Pa,” she withstood the challenge. However, she was defeated for reelection in 1926 and in a comeback in 1930, only to secure one more term as Governor in 1932. “Ma” Ferguson was the first woman to be elected a state governor in the United States. $125.

Texas politics never lacks for entertainment value. Item 197 is a campaign card For Commissioner General Land OfficeBascom Giles of Travis County. It is apparently for the election in 1938. It calls, ironically enough, to “Restore Confidence in the Administration of the Land Office.” Giles was successful in his bid for office, and eight times in total, though he declined to take his seat the final time. Giles actively promoted a program of state loans for veteran's to buy land at favorable terms. However, he began to skim money off the program, and by the time he was to take his oath for his eighth term, Giles was under investigation by the Attorney General. He would later be convicted of fraud and bribery and spend three years working in another branch of state government, its prisons. $30.

Here is another Texas tradition, along with corrupt or otherwise ignominious politicians: Deep in the Hear of Texas: Reflections of Former Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders. Published in 1991, it was written by three former Cowboy cheerleaders, sisters Suzette, Stephanie, and Sheri Scholz. This is an unauthorized look at cheerleader life, “the good, the bad and the ugly” of a tight-knit organization that generally wants you to know nothing of the latter two. This copy has been inscribed by all three sisters and their grandmother! Item 166. $20.

AE Monthly


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