• <b>Bonhams New York, FINE BOOKS & MANUSCRIPTS, 10 Dec 2014.</b>
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 5. FESTBUCH: Procession Following Charles V's Coronation as Holy Roman Emperor by Pope Clement<br>VII. Est. $120,000-180,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 6. GUTENBERG BIBLE. [Bible in Latin. Mainz: Johann Gutenberg and Fust, 1455.] Est. $40,000-60,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 21. CORONELLI, VICENZO MARIA.<br>1650-1718. [Atlante Veneto.]<br> Est. $25,000-30,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 33. GIGAULT DE LA SALLE, ACHILLE ÉTIENNE. 1772-1840. Voyage pittoresque en Sicile. Est. $25,000-35,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 50. ROTTERDAM. [DE HOOGHE, ROMEYN, AND JOANNES DE VOU.] Album.<br>Est. $50,000-70,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 77. JOSEPH, MICHAEL. A Book of Cats. Covici Friede, 1930. Est. $20,000-30,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 124. DICKENS, CHARLES. 1812-1870. The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club. Est. $20,000-25,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 145. SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM. 1564-1616. Shakespear's Comedies, Histories and Tragedies. Est. $40,000-60,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 160. JOYCE, JAMES. 1882-1941. Pomes Penyeach. Paris: Obelisk Press. [September] 1932. Est. $45,000-75,000.
  • <b>19th Century Shop</b>. 30th anniversary catalogue of landmark rare books, autographs and manuscripts, and historical photographs of all ages.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Abraham Lincoln, "a previously unknown portrait of exceptional quality." From the collection of John Hay.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. <i>The Federalist</i> (1788). An important association copy in original boards, untrimmed.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Isaac Newton. <i>Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica</i> (1687).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Shakespeare's <i>Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies</i> (1632).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. John Rockefeller. Ambrotype, the earliest known photograph of Rockefeller.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Muybridge, <i>Animal Locomotion</i> (1887) subscriber's copy.
  • <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 7: A collection of letters and documents of Scottish industrialist & politician<br>D. J. Macdonald, 1922–1939.<br>£3,000–5,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 9: MARCONI WIRELESS TELEGRAPH COMPANY – A collection of material relating to the evolution of broadcasting in the early 20th century. £3,000–5,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 27: Francesco Maurolico (1494–1575). <i>Martyrologium … Francisci Maurolyci … multo quam antea purgatum, & locupletatum</i>. Venice: Lucas Antonius Giunta, 1568. £6,000–9,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 39: Henry Purcell (1659–1695). <i>Orpheus Britannicus</i>. A Collection of all the Choicest Songs for One, Two, and Three Voices. London: for Henry Playford, 1698–1702. £3,000–5,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 111: Abraham Ortelius (1527–1598). <i>Theatrum oder Schwabüch des Erdtkreijs</i>. Antwerp: [Jan Baptist Vrients], 1602. £10,000–15,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 138: W. L. Wyllie and H. W. Brewer. <i>Bird's Eye View of London as seen from a balloon</i>. London: The Graphic, 1884. £3,000–5,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 202: John Speed (1552–1629). <i>The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine</i>. London, 1627–[46]. £15,000–25,000
  • <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Bill Wilson, Alcoholics Anonymous. Stunning first edition in original dust jacket.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Valentine Davies, Miracle on 34th Street. A holiday favorite.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility. Austen’s first published novel.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Seeking to purchase fine books and collections.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Jack Kerouac, On the Road. The Beat generation bible.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Print catalogues regularly issued, call or email for a copy.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman. An exceptional first edition.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace. Rare London edition, the first in English.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> William Wordsworth, Poems. In a charming full-morocco binding.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Print catalogues regularly issued, call or email for a copy.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451. In the publisher’s asbestos binding.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Cormac McCarthy, Blood Meridian. McCarthy’s best book.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Hound of the Baskervilles. A Fine copy.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Seeking to purchase fine books and collections.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Robert Bloch, Psycho. A lovely copy of a fragile book.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Roald Dahl, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. A perennial favorite.

AE Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - January - 2012 Issue

Signed Documents from People You Know, from The Raab Collection

Raab70

Christmas stories by Charles Dickens on the cover of the latest from the Raab Collection.

The Raab Collection has issued a new catalogue, and while that cover might make you think its title was “Christmas Tales,” it is not. That's just a picture of Charles Dickens' Christmas Tales you see. The real title here is simply Catalog 70. Offered are 26 more examples of Raab's specialty – signed documents from important persons. There are presidents and prime ministers, writers and poets, and others of significant importance. There are the greats - Washington, Lincoln, both Roosevelts, Churchill, the not-so greats – Chamberlain, Fillmore, and the both - Napoleon. The pen brings us the likes of Dickens, Byron, Whitman, and Kipling. You will know everyone in this catalogue. Here are a few.

That item you see on the cover is a special collection of Christmas Tales compiled by one Russell “Pa” Browne. It is doubtful any writer is as associated with Christmas as Charles Dickens. There are few better known people who never existed than Ebenezer Scrooge. However, Dickens wrote more holiday material than just A Christmas Carol. He edited a magazine called Household Words, and at Christmas time, he would pen stories for the issue. Browne evidently liked them, and compiled the issues of the magazine and had them bound together. One of them is signed. According to a 1933 note that accompanies this item, “Pa” Browne sent it to Dickens who obliged with his signature. The collection has been in the Browne family ever since. Item 1. Priced at $13,000.

Here is a man forever associated with one of the worst words in politics – appeasement. Neville Chamberlain had a distinguished career, and eventually he led his nation in preparation for, and the initial stages of, the Second World War. However, for too long, he believed that he could preserve the peace by appeasing Hitler, an attempt that only encouraged the German dictator. Chamberlain was a well-meaning and mostly effective leader, but he is mainly remembered for his one giant miscalculation. Item 19 is a letter Chamberlain wrote to Beverley Baxter, a fellow Conservative M.P. and a strong ally of the Prime Minister. The letter is dated June 12, 1939, written after the Munich Pact Chamberlain had negotiated, and after Hitler's invasion of Czechoslovakia, but prior to Germany's invasion of Poland that led Chamberlain and Britain into war. As the letter reveals, Chamberlain was still (unrealistically) hopeful. At one point Chamberlain tells Baxter, “Generally speaking, I should say that Italy is more pacifist than Germany, but neither does Germany want to go to war unless she is obliged.” He was dead wrong about Germany not wanting to go to war. $17,000.

Item 3 is a letter from Abraham Lincoln to General George Meade that makes us realize just how hard prosecuting the war must have been for him. He demanded aggressive prosecution of the Civil War, several times dismissing his generals for proceeding too cautiously and conservatively. Caution may have saved more lives, but to Lincoln, preserving the Union was so vital that the terrible costs had to be expended. However, if anyone thinks that Lincoln's aggressive pursuit displayed even a hint of disregard for human lives, they would completely misunderstand the man. This letter concerned one Allen G. Maxson, a corporal in the Michigan Volunteers. Maxson had been condemned to death for desertion by a court martial in January of 1864, and was scheduled for execution on January 29. They didn't run through a lot of appeals, or wait long in those days. In his letter dated January 14, Lincoln orders Meade to “Suspend execution of the death sentence in the case of Allen G. Maxson...until further order.” Such further order never came. Over the next few months, Maxson's and many other's executions were commuted. Despite the fact that some of his generals did not approve of these commutations, fearing it harmed military discipline, Lincoln could not bear such a penalty for people whose fears overwhelmed them. He hated the loss of life, even though circumstances placed him in a position where he had to send so many out to war at great risk of death. $32,000.

AE Monthly


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