• <b>Bonhams New York, FINE BOOKS & MANUSCRIPTS, 10 Dec 2014.</b>
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 5. FESTBUCH: Procession Following Charles V's Coronation as Holy Roman Emperor by Pope Clement<br>VII. Est. $120,000-180,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 6. GUTENBERG BIBLE. [Bible in Latin. Mainz: Johann Gutenberg and Fust, 1455.] Est. $40,000-60,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 21. CORONELLI, VICENZO MARIA.<br>1650-1718. [Atlante Veneto.]<br> Est. $25,000-30,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 33. GIGAULT DE LA SALLE, ACHILLE ÉTIENNE. 1772-1840. Voyage pittoresque en Sicile. Est. $25,000-35,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 50. ROTTERDAM. [DE HOOGHE, ROMEYN, AND JOANNES DE VOU.] Album.<br>Est. $50,000-70,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 77. JOSEPH, MICHAEL. A Book of Cats. Covici Friede, 1930. Est. $20,000-30,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 124. DICKENS, CHARLES. 1812-1870. The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club. Est. $20,000-25,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 145. SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM. 1564-1616. Shakespear's Comedies, Histories and Tragedies. Est. $40,000-60,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 160. JOYCE, JAMES. 1882-1941. Pomes Penyeach. Paris: Obelisk Press. [September] 1932. Est. $45,000-75,000.
  • <b>19th Century Shop</b>. 30th anniversary catalogue of landmark rare books, autographs and manuscripts, and historical photographs of all ages.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Abraham Lincoln, "a previously unknown portrait of exceptional quality." From the collection of John Hay.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. <i>The Federalist</i> (1788). An important association copy in original boards, untrimmed.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Isaac Newton. <i>Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica</i> (1687).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Shakespeare's <i>Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies</i> (1632).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. John Rockefeller. Ambrotype, the earliest known photograph of Rockefeller.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Muybridge, <i>Animal Locomotion</i> (1887) subscriber's copy.
  • <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 7: A collection of letters and documents of Scottish industrialist & politician<br>D. J. Macdonald, 1922–1939.<br>£3,000–5,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 9: MARCONI WIRELESS TELEGRAPH COMPANY – A collection of material relating to the evolution of broadcasting in the early 20th century. £3,000–5,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 27: Francesco Maurolico (1494–1575). <i>Martyrologium … Francisci Maurolyci … multo quam antea purgatum, & locupletatum</i>. Venice: Lucas Antonius Giunta, 1568. £6,000–9,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 39: Henry Purcell (1659–1695). <i>Orpheus Britannicus</i>. A Collection of all the Choicest Songs for One, Two, and Three Voices. London: for Henry Playford, 1698–1702. £3,000–5,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 111: Abraham Ortelius (1527–1598). <i>Theatrum oder Schwabüch des Erdtkreijs</i>. Antwerp: [Jan Baptist Vrients], 1602. £10,000–15,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 138: W. L. Wyllie and H. W. Brewer. <i>Bird's Eye View of London as seen from a balloon</i>. London: The Graphic, 1884. £3,000–5,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 202: John Speed (1552–1629). <i>The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine</i>. London, 1627–[46]. £15,000–25,000
  • <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Bill Wilson, Alcoholics Anonymous. Stunning first edition in original dust jacket.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Valentine Davies, Miracle on 34th Street. A holiday favorite.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility. Austen’s first published novel.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Seeking to purchase fine books and collections.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Jack Kerouac, On the Road. The Beat generation bible.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Print catalogues regularly issued, call or email for a copy.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman. An exceptional first edition.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace. Rare London edition, the first in English.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> William Wordsworth, Poems. In a charming full-morocco binding.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Print catalogues regularly issued, call or email for a copy.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451. In the publisher’s asbestos binding.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Cormac McCarthy, Blood Meridian. McCarthy’s best book.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Hound of the Baskervilles. A Fine copy.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Seeking to purchase fine books and collections.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Robert Bloch, Psycho. A lovely copy of a fragile book.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Roald Dahl, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. A perennial favorite.

AE Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - October - 2011 Issue

Children's and Illustrated Books from Aleph-Bet

Alephbet98

The latest from Aleph-Bet Books.

Aleph-Bet Books has issued its Catalogue 98 of Children's Books and Illustrated Books. These works are primarily both, children's and illustrated books, and though 600 items are offered, each has at least one color illustration accompanying it. As such, there are probably a few covers shown that you will remember from your childhood, especially if that time was quite awhile ago. Once again, Aleph-Bet takes us back to a time of innocence, or at least seeming innocence for we were very young.

There are but a handful of children's books that rise to the level of popularity and collectibility of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. This tale of a place very unlike Kansas had already spawned dozens of books, both by its author, L. Frank Baum, and his successors, by the time it was made into one of the best known movies ever filmed. Item 60 is a copy of the first edition of this classic, published in 1900. Priced at $32,000.

Baum wrote for both children and adults, but after the great success of the Wizard, few thought of him as anything but a children's author. In fact, the association was so great that he feared using his name on other types of books could hurt his very successful career. So, when he published a novel for adults in 1908, he did so anonymously. Item 67 is The Last Egyptian: a romance of the Nile. This, too, would be made into a movie, in 1914, but unlike Judy Garland's version of the Wizard, this film was a flop. $275.

While the original Wizard was illustrated by W.W. Denslow, the next 35 of the “canonical” Oz books were illustrated by John R. Neill. In fact, Neill wrote three Oz books in the early 1940s, dying while writing a fourth. However, his work was not limited to Oz, and the year after illustrating his first title in that series, he provided the illustrations for this work: Romero and Julietta, by Tudor Jenks, published in 1905. This is the story of a princess who becomes very small, is rescued by a small prince, and then has to address the problem that arises in their relationship when she returns to full size. Item 379. $225.

After Baum died, the series was continued by Ruth Plumly Thompson. She would go on to write the next 19 “canonical” books in the series, more than anyone else, Baum included. Thompson wrote a few other books, though not nearly as many as her Oz titles. Her one book published before she started writing for Oz is this one: The Perhappsy Chaps. Published in 1918, it consists of fairy tales written in verse. Item 553. $975.

Not all children's books were meant for pure entertainment. Some carried weighty messages. Item 79 is A Home in the South, or Two Years at Uncle Warren's, by “A Lady.” Published in 1857 by the American Reform Book and Tract Society, this work was designed to instruct children in the horrors of slavery. In the story, three children lose their parents, and as a result are sent to live with their Uncle Warren in the South. The children are forewarned that the slaves are “poor degraded half brutalized creatures,” whom they should do all they can to help. Uncle Warren is oblivious to all this, but in time, he, like the children, comes to see and understand the wrongs, and by the end, frees his slaves. Unfortunately, few other slaveholders saw the light, so civil war would come a few years later to force them to act as did the fictional Uncle Warren. $1,200.

AE Monthly


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