AE Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - January - 2011 Issue

Important Signed Documents from The Raab Collection

Sickhobart

President McKinley inquires into the health of his ailing vice president.

In his letter, Sherman also predicted an attack on the Fort would "arouse a storm" which would make the slavery debate seem like nothing. Fast forward five years. Too many people have learned the hard way that Sherman was right. Now, Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States, is on the run. But, he will not escape. Heading deeper South and hoping to make it to Mexico, Davis is surrounded and captured at Irwinville, Georgia, in the early morning hours of May 10, 1865. The capture is effected by the Fourth Michigan Cavalry under Benjamin D. Pritchard. Item 1 is Pritchard's original signed report, dated May 11, 1865, relating Davis' capture to his superior officer. Writes Pritchard, "I have the honor to report that at daylight yesterday, at Irwinville, I surprised and captured Jeff. Davis and family…" $12,000.

 

Item 37 is a brief telegram from President William McKinley concerning a sad event that would have a major impact one day on American history. Dated Nov. 12 (1899), the President enquires of a Dr. Newton in New Jersey, "How is the Vice President today?" The Vice President was not well. That would have been Garret Hobart, a Republican party leader from New Jersey who had never held high office when he was selected to be McKinley's running mate in 1896. It did not matter. The economy was a mess and McKinley, Hobart tagging along, was elected with ease. Hobart became a close confident of McKinley, and thereby influential in an office that traditionally held little influence. However, Hobart's health began to deteriorate in 1899, and though only 55 years old, he returned to New Jersey in hopes of recovering. It did not happen, and nine days after this enquiry, Hobart suffered a heart attack and died. It was a sad, though not significant event in American history. However, Hobart's death meant McKinley needed to find a new vice-presidential candidate when he sought reelection in 1900, and that candidate would be Theodore Roosevelt. When McKinley himself died in office, a result of an assassination, Roosevelt, not Hobart, became President, and he would alter American policy in ways unseen since the time of Lincoln. $3,000.

 

The Raab Collection may be reached at 800-977-8333. Their website is www.raabcollection.com.

 

 

AE Monthly


Review Search

Archived Reviews

Ask Questions